MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment

MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment 代写

7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra

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MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY (9027|3)
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY
The University of Canberra acknowledges the Ngunnawal peoples as the traditional custodians of the land upon which the University’s
main campus sits, and pays respect to all Elders past and present.
INTRODUCTION
This Unit Outline must be read in conjunction with:
a. UC Student Guide to Policies, which sets out University-wide policies and procedures, including information on matters such as
plagiarism, grade descriptors, moderation, feedback and deferred exams, and is available at http://www.canberra.edu.au/current-
students/student-policies.
b. Any additional information specified in section 6.
1. CORE UNIT DETAILS
Unit Code and Version: 9027|3
Unit Title: Media, Technology and Society
Unit Level: 1
Owning Faculty/Section: Faculty of Arts and Design
UC Discipline/Section: Discipline of Communication and Media
Enrolled Credit Points: 3
Unit Offering Details:
Semester 2, 2017, ON-CAMPUS, BRUCE (164832)
For an explanation of delivery modes see Unit Modes of Delivery Titles.
Unit Convener Name and Contact Details:
Anji Perera
Email: Anji.Perera@canberra.edu.au
Telephone: 02 6201 2575
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
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Administrative Contact Details:
Room 9C6
(02) 6201 2475
FADadmin@canberra.edu.au
2. ACADEMIC CONTENT
Unit Description
This unit examines the relationship between technology and human society within the context of media and how media represents and
influences society’s political, cultural and institutional systems. Media technology is viewed as a central organising theme in society in
shaping Australian democracy and politics. This unit is designed to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the
broader Australian culture of which it is a part. Topics to be covered include recent trends in the news media, theories of attitude formation
and change, the role of sources in the construction of the news, the economics of news production and consumption, the ways in which
the news shapes the public’s perceptions of the political world, campaign communication, and the general role of the mass media in the
democratic process.
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. demonstrate a firm understanding of multiple methods and approaches by which
to assess technology in various social and political terms;
2. demonstrate an understanding of the various ways by which to assess the mutual relationship between society and technology;
3. demonstrate an awareness of ethics and citizenship via current issues in media and politics;
4. apply analytical tools to identify a societal or ethical problem resulting from the use of technologies.
Graduate Attributes
1. UC graduates are professional – communicate effectively
1. UC graduates are professional – display initiative and drive, and use their organisation skills to plan and manage their workload
1. UC graduates are professional – use creativity, critical thinking, analysis and research skills to solve theoretical and real-world
problems
2. UC graduates are global citizens – think globally about issues in their profession
2. UC graduates are global citizens – understand issues in their profession from the perspective of other cultures
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – be self-aware
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – evaluate and adopt new technology
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – reflect on their own practice, updating and adapting their knowledge and skills for continual
professional and academic development
Skills Development
As students of the University of Canberra, you will develop your critical thinking skills, your ability to solve complex problems, your ability
to work with others, your confidence to learn independently, your written communication skills, your spoken communication skills and a
number of work-related knowledge and skills.
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
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Prerequisite
Not Specified.
Co-requisite
Not Specified.
3. TIMETABLE OF ACTIVITIES
Week Date Lecture Readings Assessment
1 7 August
Introductory lecture:
Overview of unit,
assessment
requirements and
library research skills
session
No tutorials in
Week 1
Unit Outline – available on the Unit’s Moodle site.
What’s the best, most effective way of taking notes?, Getting
the most from lectures and Tutorial Participation available on
the Unit’s Moodle site. There is a range of other material on the
Unit’s Moodle site to assist you with study skills & to perform
well in this uni.
2 14 August
Media matters &
effects: theories and
methods
Tutorials
commence. Sign up
for reading
presentations.
Cunninghan, S. & Turner, G. (Eds) (2010). Introduction: the
media and communications today. In The media and
communications in Australia (pp.1-11). Crows Nest, NSW: Allen
& Unwin.
Kellner, D. (2009). Chapter 1: Towards a critical media/cultural
studies. In R. Hammer & D. Kellner (Eds) Media/cultural
studies: critical approaches (pp.1-24). New York: Peter Lang.
3 21 August
Media effects case
study
Text-based news:
agenda setting &
framing
Tutorial reading
presentations
commence.
McQuail, D. (2005). Chapter 17: Processes and models of
media effects. In McQuail’s mass communication theory (pp.
455-478). London: Sage.
Balnaves, M. (2009). Chapter 4: Classics in Media and Effects.
In Media theories and approaches: a global perspective (pp.
57-83). Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan
Valkenburg, P. M., & Peter, J. (2013). The differential
susceptibility to media effects model. Journal of
Communciation, 63(2), 221-243. doi:10.1111/jcom.12024
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
4 28 August Reading media
messages (i):
semiotics & signs
Tewksbury, D. & Scheufele, D. (2009). Chapter 2: News
framing theory and research. In J. Bryant & M. B. Oliver
(Eds) Media effects: advances in theory and research (pp.17-
33). New York: Routledge.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 4/20
Wiest, J.B. (2017). Entertaining genius: U.S. media
representations of exceptional intelligence. Mediatropes, 6(2),
148-170.
Walsh, C. (2015). Media capital or media deficit?:
Representations of women in leadership roles in old and new
media. Feminist Media Studies, 15(6), 1025-1034.
doi:10.1080/14680777.2015.1087415
5 4 September
Reading media
messages (ii):
ideology &
hegemony
O’Shaughnessy M., & Stadler, J. (Eds). (2008). Chapters 8 & 9
(partial). In Media & society (pp.133-148;153;156-161), South
Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.
Schirato, T., Buettner, A., Jutel, T., & Stahl, G. (2010).
Analysing the media: theories, concepts and techniques.
In Understanding media studies (pp.27-49). Melbourne,
Australia: Oxford University Press.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
6 11 September
Theorising
audiences: citizens,
consumers,
commodities, users
O’Shaughnessy M., & Stadler, J. (Eds). (2008). Chapters 11 &
13 (partial). In Media & society (pp.173-180; 197-215). South
Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.
North, L. (2009). ‘Blokey’ newsroom culture. Media International
Australia, 132(Aug), 5-15
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
7 18 September
Media economics:
understanding the
economic paradigms
in media industries
Figueiredo, B. (2016). Imagining the global: Transnational
media and popular culture beyond east and west. Consumption
Markets and Culture, 1-4.doi:10.1080/10253866.2016.1161744
Nitoiu, C. (2015). Supporting the EU’s approach to climate
change: The discourse of the transnational media within the
‘brussels bubble’. Journal of European Integration, 37(5), 535-
552. doi:10.1080/07036337.2015.1019879
Webster, J. & Phalen, P. (1994). Chapter two. Victim, consumer
or commodity? Audience models in communication policy. In J,
Ettema. & C. Whitney (Eds), Audiencemaking. Thousand Oaks,
CA: Sage.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
8 25 September No lecture/tutorial
Class free week.
Assessment Item 2: Analysis of
news representation of academic
research due 5pm Wednesday
27 September. Submission via
Moodle dropbox.
9 2 October
Text content
industries:
newspapers & books
(Online lecture due
to public holiday on
Monday)
Albarran, A. (2010). Chapter Three: Key concepts to
understanding the media economy. In A. Alberran, The Media
Economy. New York: Routledge.
Napoli, P. (2009). Chapter 12. Media economics and the study
of media industries. In J. Holt. & A. Peren (Eds), Media
industries: history, theory and method. West Sussex, UK:
Wiley-Blackwell.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 5/20
10 9 October Platform industry:
television
Tapscott, D. & Williams, A. D. (2010). Chapter 11. The demise
of the newspaper and the rise of the new news. In D. Tapscott
& A. D. Williams, Macrowikinomics: Rebooting the Business
and the World. London: Atlantic Books.
Carr, N. (2010). Chapter 6. The very image of a book. In The
Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains. London:
W.W. Norton & Company.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
11 16 October
The internet changes
everything…or does
it?
Networked “new”
media, digital divide
and performance
identities
(Guest lecture)
Comer, J., & Wikle, T. (2015). Access to locally oriented
television broadcasting in a digital era. Applied Geography, 60,
280-287. Doi:10.1016/j.apgeog.2014.11.001
Doyle, G. (2016). Resistance of channels: Television
distribution in the multiplatform era. Telematics and Informatics,
33(2), 693-702. Doi:10.1016/j.tele.2015.06.015
Doyle, G. (2016). Digitization and changing windowing
strategies in the television industry: negotiating new windows
on the world. Television & New Media, 17(7), 629-645.
doi:10.1177/1527476416641194
Doyle, G. (2002). Chapter four. Television Broadcasting.
In Understanding Media Economics. London: Sage
Publications.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
12 23 October
Political imagery &
performance
(Guest lecture)
Broadbent, R., & Papadopoulos, T. (2013). Bridging the digital
divide – an Australian story. Behaviour and Information
Technology, 32(1), 4-13. doi:10.1080/0144929X.2011.572186
Senft, T. M. (2013) Chapter 22: Microcelebrity and the branded
self. In J. Hartley, J. Burgess & A. Bruns (Eds), A companion to
new media dynamics (pp.346-354). Chichester, Malden, MA :
John Wiley & Sons.
Errington, W. & Miragliotta, N. (2007). Chapter 10: New media
and the prospects for democracy. In Media and Politics: an
introduction (pp.182-201). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford
University Press.
Supplementary readings:
Baker, C.E. (2007). Chapter 3: Not a real problem: the market
or the internet will provide. In Baker, C.E. Media concentration
and democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Zollers, A. (2009). Critical perspectives on social network sites.
Media/cultural studies (pp. 602-614). New York: Peter Lang.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
13 30 October
Summary & review
(No tutorials and
lecture this week.
Work on Assessment
3)
Craig, G (2004) Chapter 6 ‘Political image and performance’.
In The Media, politics and public life (pp.112-129). Crows
News, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
Sanders, K (2009) Symbolic politics: “all the world’s a stage”.
In Communicating politics in the 21 st century, (pp.40-54).
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan
Assessment Item 3:
Media/technology essay due 5pm
on Sunday 5 November.
Submission via Moodle dropbox.
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 6/20
4. UNIT RESOURCES
4a List of Required Texts/Readings:
Week one:
Unit Outline.
What’s the best, most effective way to take notes? Getting the most from lectures and Tutorial Participation available on the Unit’s Moodle
site. There is a range of other material on the Unit’s Moodle site to assist you with study skills & to perform well in this unit.
Week two:
Cunninghan, S. & Turner, G. (Eds) (2010). Introduction: the media and communications today. In The media and communications in
Australia (pp.1-11). Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
Kellner, D. (2009). Chapter 1: Towards a critical media/cultural studies. In R. Hammer & D. Kellner (Eds) Media/cultural studies: critical
approaches (pp.1-24). New York: Peter Lang.
Week three:
McQuail, D. (2005). Chapter 17: Processes and models of media effects. In McQuail’s mass communication theory (pp. 455-478).
London: Sage.
Balnaves, M. (2009). Chapter 4: Classics in Media and Effects. In Media theories and approaches: a global perspective (pp. 57-83).
Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan
Valkenburg, P. M., & Peter, J. (2013). The differential susceptibility to media effects model. Journal of Communciation, 63(2), 221-243.
doi:10.1111/jcom.12024
Week four:
Tewksbury, D. & Scheufele, D. (2009). Chapter 2: News framing theory and research. In J. Bryant & M. B. Oliver (Eds) Media effects:
advances in theory and research (pp.17-33). New York: Routledge.
Wiest, J.B. (2017). Entertaining genius: U.S. media representations of exceptional intelligence. Mediatropes, 6(2), 148-170.
Walsh, C. (2015). Media capital or media deficit?: Representations of women in leadership roles in old and new media. Feminist Media
Studies, 15(6), 1025-1034. doi:10.1080/14680777.2015.1087415
Week five:
O’Shaughnessy M., & Stadler, J. (Eds). (2008). Chapters 8 & 9 (partial). In Media & society (pp.133-148;153;156-161), South Melbourne,
VIC: Oxford University Press.
Schirato, T., Buettner, A., Jutel, T., & Stahl, G. (2010). Analysing the media: theories, concepts and techniques. In Understanding media
studies (pp.27-49). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.
Week six:
O’Shaughnessy M., & Stadler, J. (Eds). (2008). Chapters 11 & 13 (partial). In Media & society (pp.173-180; 197-215). South Melbourne,
VIC: Oxford University Press.
North, L. (2009). ‘Blokey’ newsroom culture. Media International Australia, 132(Aug), 5-15
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 7/20
Week seven:
Figueiredo, B. (2016). Imagining the global: Transnational media and popular culture beyond east and west. Consumption Markets and
Culture, 1-4.doi:10.1080/10253866.2016.1161744
Nitoiu, C. (2015). Supporting the EU’s approach to climate change: The discourse of the transnational media within the ‘brussels bubble’.
Journal of European Integration, 37(5), 535-552. doi:10.1080/07036337.2015.1019879
Webster, J. & Phalen, P. (1994). Chapter two. Victim, consumer or commodity? Audience models in communication policy. In J, Ettema. &
C. Whitney (Eds), Audiencemaking. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Week nine:
Albarran, A. (2010). Chapter Three: Key concepts to understanding the media economy. In A. Alberran, The Media Economy. New York:
Routledge.
Napoli, P. (2009). Chapter 12. Media economics and the study of media industries. In J. Holt. & A. Peren (Eds), Media industries: history,
theory and method. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
Week ten:
Tapscott, D. & Williams, A. D. (2010). Chapter 11. The demise of the newspaper and the rise of the new news. In D. Tapscott & A. D.
Williams, Macrowikinomics: Rebooting the Business and the World. London: Atlantic Books.
Carr, N. (2010). Chapter 6. The very image of a book. In The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains. London: W.W. Norton &
Company.
Week eleven:
Comer, J., & Wikle, T. (2015). Access to locally oriented television broadcasting in a digital era. Applied Geography, 60, 280-287.
Doi:10.1016/j.apgeog.2014.11.001
Doyle, G. (2016). Resistance of channels: Television distribution in the multiplatform era. Telematics and Informatics, 33(2), 693-702.
Doi:10.1016/j.tele.2015.06.015
Doyle, G. (2016). Digitization and changing windowing strategies in the television industry: negotiating new windows on the world.
Television & New Media, 17(7), 629-645. doi:10.1177/1527476416641194
Doyle, G. (2002). Chapter four. Television Broadcasting. In Understanding Media Economics. London: Sage Publications.
Week twelve:
Broadbent, R., & Papadopoulos, T. (2013). Bridging the digital divide – an Australian story. Behaviour and Information Technology, 32(1),
4-13. doi:10.1080/0144929X.2011.572186
Senft, T. M. (2013) Chapter 22: Microcelebrity and the branded self. In J. Hartley, J. Burgess & A. Bruns (Eds), A companion to new media
dynamics (pp.346-354). Chichester, Malden, MA : John Wiley & Sons.
Errington, W. & Miragliotta, N. (2007). Chapter 10: New media and the prospects for democracy. In Media and Politics: an
introduction (pp.182-201). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.
Week twelve supplementary readings:
Baker, C.E. (2007). Chapter 3: Not a real problem: the market or the internet will provide. In Baker, C.E. Media concentration and
democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 8/20
Due Date:
Weighting Percentage:
Zollers, A. (2009). Critical perspectives on social network sites. Media/cultural studies (pp. 602-614). New York: Peter Lang.
Week thirteen:
Craig, G (2004) Chapter 6 ‘Political image and performance’. In The Media, politics and public life (pp.112-129). Crows News, NSW: Allen
& Unwin.
Sanders, K (2009) Symbolic politics: “all the world’s a stage”. In Communicating politics in the 21 st century, (pp.40-54). Houndmills,
Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan
4b Materials and Equipment:
None
4c Unit Website:
To find your unit website online, login to LearnOnline (Moodle) using your student ID.
Note that LearnOnline (Moodle) has a profile page that displays your name and email address for the benefit of other students. If you
prefer to hide your email address, click here for instructions.
The unit Moodle site URL is: http://learnonline.canberra.edu.au/course/view.php?id=18515
5A. ASSESSMENT ITEM DETAILS
Click on an Assessment Item for more details.
Tutorial reading presenta?on & par?cipa?on
From Week 3 – 12
30
Addresses learning outcome(s):
On completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. demonstrate a firm understanding of multiple methods and approaches
by which to assess technology in various social and political terms;
2. demonstrate an understanding of the various ways by which to assess the mutual relationship between society and
technology;
Related graduate attribute(s):
1. UC graduates are professional – communicate effectively
1. UC graduates are professional – use creativity, critical thinking, analysis and research skills to solve theoretical and real-
world problems
2. UC graduates are global citizens – think globally about issues in their profession
2. UC graduates are global citizens – understand issues in their profession from the perspective of other cultures
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – evaluate and adopt new technology
Due date Weekly ac?vi?es from Week 3 – 12
Purpose The purpose of the presenta?on is to provide a summary and analysis of the
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
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key concepts and ideas contained in the reading, including ques?ons and/or
discussion points for the tutorial class.
The purpose of tutorial par?cipa?on is to demonstrate engagement with the
reading and Unit ideas and concepts. There is an expecta?on that students
will a?end and par?cipate in all tutorials. This is because par?cipa?on
through a?endance is an important and significant component of mee?ng
the learning outcomes of the unit.
Process In Week 2 tutorials each student will be allocated a reading from the list of
weekly readings presented in the Timetable of Ac?vi?es and available
through the Unit’s Moodle site.
What to
prepare &
present
All students should sign-up for a Tutorial Presenta?on in the Week 2 tutorial.
The nominated student for the reading each week should prepare a
presenta?on that includes:
b.  a summary of the key ideas/concepts from the reading (5-
10 minutes);
c.  an analysis of the key ideas/concepts and applica?on of these to
appropriate and relevant current examples consistent with the course’s
themes and topics. For example, to what extent do the reading’s ideas
help to understand and explain current events and examples within
media, technologies & society? (5-10 minutes); and
d.  discussion points and ques?ons for tutorial members. This will be the
base for discussion in class that week (5-10 minutes). For example, what
are some of the tensions/areas of debate currently in this area? Who is
on which side of the debate and how does the reading’s ideas help us to
understand these areas of difference?
The minimum/maximum ?me limit for a presenta?on is between 20-
30 minutes, including ?me for discussion by tutorial members and no
presenta?on should be longer than 30 minutes.
Given the length and complexity of some of the readings, students may
choose either to:
a.  present a summary of all the key ideas/concepts contained in the
reading and focus on a few (1-3) for analysis and applica?on (summarise
all key ideas/concepts and analyse/apply a few) then facilitate
discussion with ques?ons; or
b.  focus on only a few (1-3) key ideas/concepts for summary, analysis
applica?on (summarise a few key ideas/concepts and analyse/apply a
few) then facilitate discussion with ques?ons.
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
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Due Date:
Weighting Percentage:
All students are expected to par?cipate in the in-class discussion by:
a.  reading the relevant readings available on Moodle;
b.  a?ending/listening to the relevant lecture prior to the tutorial;
c.  thinking about the reading material and its implica?on for media and
communica?on professional prac?ce and in rela?on to the course’s
themes; and
d.  par?cipa?ng in tutorial discussions.
Wri?en reports will not be accepted as a subs?tute for missed tutorial
a?endance and par?cipa?on.
Marking
criteria
Taking into account the length and complexity of the reading and the
student’s decision to cover all/a few of the key ideas/concepts, presenta?ons
will be marked on the following criteria which are weighted equally and
comprises 20% of the value of this assessment item:
a.  Selec?on and summary of key ideas/concepts;
b.  Analysis and applica?on of key ideas/concepts with appropriate and
relevant examples, in the context of the course’s themes & topics;
c.  Presenta?on skills including oral communica?on skills and use of visual
media;
d.  Engagement with audience including discussions ques?ons and/or
ac?vi?es; and
e.  Time management.
The marking template for tutorial presenta?ons is available on the Unit’s
Moodle site.
Tutorial par?cipa?on will be assessed by evidence of having read the weekly
readings and evidence of cri?cal engagement with the reading material and
with ideas & concepts presented in the Unit. This part of the assessment
comprises 10% of your overall unit grade and will be included in the final
grade for this assessment item when uploaded to the Unit’s Moodle site. A
descrip?on of Tutorial Par?cipa?on Grades is available on the Unit’s Moodle
site.
Analysis of news representa?on of academic research
5pm Wednesday 27 September (Week 8) Submission via Moodle dropbox
30
Addresses learning outcome(s):
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
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On completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. demonstrate a firm understanding of multiple methods and approaches
by which to assess technology in various social and political terms;
2. demonstrate an understanding of the various ways by which to assess the mutual relationship between society and
technology;
3. demonstrate an awareness of ethics and citizenship via current issues in media and politics;
4. apply analytical tools to identify a societal or ethical problem resulting from the use of technologies.
Related graduate attribute(s):
1. UC graduates are professional – communicate effectively

MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment 代写

1. UC graduates are professional – display initiative and drive, and use their organisation skills to plan and manage their
workload
1. UC graduates are professional – use creativity, critical thinking, analysis and research skills to solve theoretical and real-
world problems
2. UC graduates are global citizens – understand issues in their profession from the perspective of other cultures
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – reflect on their own practice, updating and adapting their knowledge and skills for
continual professional and academic development
Purpose The purpose of this assessment is for you to analyse news media
representa?ons of academic research using Unit concepts, the differences
between quan?ta?ve and qualita?ve research methods and assess the
news representa?on against values of accuracy, objec?vity and balance.
Process The assessment is carried out in a number of stages:
1.  Choose one of the 3 news media ar?cles available on the Unit’s
Moodle site at Week 8.
2.  From informa?on contained in the news report on the academic
research create a set of keywords to help you guide your search for
the research ar?cle. Ar?cle and database searching will be presented
in lectures.
3.  Using your set of keywords search the journal databases to which the
library university has access. Find the original research ar?cle and use
Ulrichsweb to ascertain if the academic journal is peer-reviewed.
4.  Cri?cally analyse (compare/contrast & evaluate) the representa?on of
the research in the news ar?cle. Examine whether there are news
frames, narra?ves, ideologies and/or hegemonic ideas/values present
in the news ar?cle representa?on of the academic research and/or
par?cular news frames evident and cri?cally reflect upon the
presence/use of these. Argue whether or not the research has been
represented accurately, objec?vely and in a balanced manner in the
news ar?cle. Discuss whether qualita?ve and quan?ta?ve research
methods were used and whether this is represented in the
newspaper/magazine/online ar?cle. Indicate whether the academic
research is peer-reviewed or not.
5.  Include a minimum of 3 addi?onal references from the Unit’s readings
in addi?on to the academic research and news media pieces in your
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analysis. References are not included in the word count. Use either the
Harvard or APA referencing systems. NB: no footnotes or endnotes.
Here is the link to the referencing guides made available by the UC
Library h?p://canberra.libguides.com/referencing
At the end of your piece include a list of References only of material cited
in your essay. Do not include in your list of References material not cited in
your essay.
6.  Ensure your student number, ?tle of assessment, tutorial day/?me,
referencing system used and word count are included at the beginning
of your assignment before submi?ng it via the assignment dropbox
on Moodle.
Presenta?on 1,000 word report (+/- 10%), not including long quotes (>40 words as
defined in APA), list of References or assessment first page informa?on.
At least 3 references from the Unit’s reading list in addi?on to the news
media report and academic research ar?cle source.
Harvard or APA referencing system.
Marking
Criteria
Assignments will be marked using the following criteria, weighted equally:
1. Analyses news media text using news framing, narra?ve, ideology
and/or hegemony.
2. Assesses news media representa?on of academic research against the
values of accuracy, objec?vity and balance.
3. Demonstrates an understanding of whether qualita?ve and/or
quan?ta?ve research methods used by the academic research ar?cle, the
differences between them and whether the academic research ar?cle is
peer-reviewed or not.
4. Clear, concise and comprehensible wri?en expression appropriate for
university level and an academic audience.
5. Adherence to Harvard or APA referencing, at least 3 sources from the
Unit’s reading list and 2 other academically credible sources and word
count met.
Online or generic dic?onaries are not academically credible. Most online
sources will not be viewed as academically credible unless a peer-reviewed
academic journal site.
A marking rubric is available on the Unit’s Moodle site. This will be used as
the basis for marking and feedback on your assessment.
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Due Date:
Weighting Percentage:
Media/technology essay
5pm Sunday 5 November (end of Week 13) submission via Moodle dropbox
40
Addresses learning outcome(s):
On completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. demonstrate a firm understanding of multiple methods and approaches
by which to assess technology in various social and political terms;
2. demonstrate an understanding of the various ways by which to assess the mutual relationship between society and
technology;
3. demonstrate an awareness of ethics and citizenship via current issues in media and politics;
4. apply analytical tools to identify a societal or ethical problem resulting from the use of technologies.
Related graduate attribute(s):
1. UC graduates are professional – communicate effectively
1. UC graduates are professional – display initiative and drive, and use their organisation skills to plan and manage their
workload
1. UC graduates are professional – use creativity, critical thinking, analysis and research skills to solve theoretical and real-
world problems
2. UC graduates are global citizens – think globally about issues in their profession
2. UC graduates are global citizens – understand issues in their profession from the perspective of other cultures
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – evaluate and adopt new technology
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – reflect on their own practice, updating and adapting their knowledge and skills for
continual professional and academic development
Purpose
Essay Question: How has a specific medium or technology (of your
choice), produced an impact upon society?
The purpose of the essay is to critically examine a medium or technology using
themes and concepts from the unit’s lectures and readings and additional
research. This will involve assessing and evaluating the relationship with and
the impact of, the medium/technology on society
Process Students choose either a medium or technology (examples are listed below
and are explained in the lectures) and cri?cally examine it using themes
and concepts from the unit’s lectures, readings and addi?onal research.
The objec?ve is to assess and evaluate the impact of the
medium/technology on, and its rela?onship with, society.
Some key ques?ons to be used as star?ng points are suggested in the next
sec?on. Examples of medium or technology include;
Media content: audio, audiovisual, visual, news, text, film, games
Online services: online news, eBooks, user-generated content sites such as
YouTube, social networking sites (SNS), music streaming sites (e.g Pandora,
Spo?fy) and audiovisual content (e.g. Hulu, NetFlix, Stan)
Pla?orms/devices: smartphones, tablets, gaming consoles, radio, TV,
newspapers, books, cinema, cameras
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For example, you might choose to examine the introduc?on & use of
smartphones. Or you could examine the move away from purchasing music
on CDs to purchasing online. You could examine the introduc?on &
development of gaming consoles and compare/contrast that with online
gaming. You could examine the advent of eBooks and the impact on
printed books. Or you could examine the produc?on and distribu?on of
online news and the rela?onships with printed and mobile news pla?orms.
You could look at a social networking site and, depending on your focus,
you could examine its actual use compared with its ‘ideal’ use &/or you
could examine the economics of user-generated content and how this
does/does not influence the ongoing development of the site.
If you are unsure of your essay focus, check with your Tutor.
Key
ques?ons
For your chosen medium/technology, cri?cally examine (assess and
evaluate the impact of the medium/technology on, and its rela?onship
with, society) it using themes and concepts from the unit’s lectures and
readings and addi?onal research.
The following ques?ons* are provided as star?ng points for your analysis.
YOU DO NOT HAVE TO ANSWER ALL OF THEM. You should choose which
are the most appropriate for your chosen medium/technology as well as
developing your own in the context of themes and concepts from this
course:
Histories
When and how did the medium/technology appear? Who and what was
involved in its inven?on and development? What did people imagine
would its main use and significance? How was it actually adopted, resisted
or ignored? Was the medium/technology used differently by different
groups or people or in different parts of the world? Who were the
early/late adopters of the medium/technology and what impacts did this
have?
Discourses and ideologies
What are the ideas or discourses associated with the medium/technology?
What do people think they do with the medium/technology? What are the
affects and emo?ons associated with the medium/technology? How is the
medium/technology represented/portrayed and wri?en and spoken about
in the media? How are ideas about what media is and what it does
changed by this medium/technology?
Exis?ng media
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How did/does the medium/technology fit into or disrupt exis?ng media?
Are there new companies and organisa?ons responsible for delivering new
kinds of media associated with the medium/technology? What are the
features and characteris?cs of these new companies/organisa?ons? What
are the economics of produc?on, distribu?on, exhibi?on, consump?on and
business models of these companies/organisa?ons? Who are the
audiences and publics that come into being or realign with the
medium/technology?
Cultural and social
How do/did people use the medium/technology? What is their actual
experience of it, independent of the marke?ng/promo?on of the intended
experience of the medium/technology? What do they do with it and with
whom? What are the par?cular cultures associated with the
medium/technology? How does the medium/technology affect the larger
culture and society? How are rela?ons among different groups of people,
and groups of things, altered, or believed to be altered, through the
introduc?on of the medium/technology? Have there been ‘moral panics’
associated with the medium/technology? What are the ethical
issues/implica?ons of the medium/technology?
*Ques?ons adapted from Goggin, G. (2012). New technologies and the
media (pp.123-124). Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave
Macmillan.
Presenta?on 2,000 word essay (+/- 10%), not including long quotes (>40 words in APA),
list of References or assessment coversheet.
At least 10 academically credible sources cited, including 6 sources from
the Unit’s reading list.
Harvard or APA referencing system.
Ensure your student ID, ?tle of assessment, word count and reference
system used are included at the beginning of your assignment before
submi?ng it via the assignment dropbox on Moodle.
Marking
criteria
Essays will be marked on the following criteria which are weighted equally:
1. Analysis of medium/technology using key ideas/concepts from the unit.
2. Research on medium/technology and presenta?on of appropriate
academically credible evidence.
3. Analysis of the academically credible evidence and the wider
implica?ons of it for the medium/technology and the wider society.
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4. Clear, concise and comprehensible wri?en expression appropriate for
university level and an academic audience.
5. Adherence to Harvard or APA referencing, at least 6 references from the
Unit’s reading list along with other academically credible sources and word
count met.
Online or generic dic?onaries are not academically credible. Most online
sources will not be viewed as academically credible unless a peer-reviewed
academic journal site.
A marking template is available on the Unit’s Moodle site. This will be used
as the basis for marking and feedback on your assessment.
5B. ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS
Submission of assessment items:
Where possible, all assessment items will be submitted online via the LearnOnline (Moodle) unit site. The first page of each assessment
item should include the following information:
Student ID:
Assessment Name:
Word Count (if applicable):
Students should note that names are not to be included on any assessment tasks/submissions. Only Student ID numbers should be
included (as per the Assessment Policy and Procedures).
Extensions
Students can apply for an extension to the submission due date for an assessment item through extenuating, evidenced circumstances
(specific details are found through the Assessment Policy and Procedures. Section 9.12). Extensions must be applied for before the due
date. Documentary evidence (e.g. medical certificate) will be expected for an extension to be granted, however this will not guarantee that
the application will be successful. The Unit Convener or relevant Discipline Convener will decide whether to grant an extension and the
length of the extension.
An Assignment Extension form is available from the Student Forms page.
Late submission of assignments without an approved extension will result in a penalty of 5% reduced marks from the total available, per
calendar day late. An assignment submitted over 7 days late will not be accepted.
All assessment items except the Tutorial Reading Presenta?on & Par?cipa?on will be submi?ed
online via the unit Moodle site. The first page should include the following informa?on:
Student ID:
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Assessment Name:
Word Count:
Reference System Used:
Tutorial day/?me:
Special Assessment Requirements:
Information on extensions and special consideration for assessments can be found in the Student Guide to Policies.
Year-Long Units: Students enrolled in year-long units (consisting of a part A and part B unit code) will be allocated a continuing grade
(CNTYL) on completion of part A. Once the student has completed part B, the grade for part A will be updated so that the grades for the
two unit codes are the same.
NO resubmits are permitted on any assessment item.
A reasonable a?empt must be made on ALL assessment items.
There are NO pass requirements on any individual assessment item in order to pass the unit.
There are penal?es for assessments submi?ed a?er the due ?me and date. See clause on Late
Submissions below.
Requests for extensions
Requests for extensions are to be made on the Extension Request Form available on Moodle with
accompanying appropriate documenta?on BEFORE THE DUE DATE to the Unit Convenor. Requests
for extensions will not be considered a?er the assessment due date/?me has passed and late
penal?es will apply as outlined in below.
An approved extension only grants addi?onal ?me: a student’s work will s?ll be assessed against
the marking criteria to ensure achievement of the required academic standard.
The responsibility rests on students to comply with unit requirements for comple?ng and
submi?ng assessable items for the unit. This responsibility is an integral part of professional
prac?ce and performance skills this unit seeks to promote; skills that are especially important for
those seeking professional careers in the media, communica?on and crea?ve industries.
Teaching staff have a responsibility to ensure equity and fairness to the majority of students who
submit assessable work on ?me. For these reasons, it is your responsibility to establish genuine and
excep?onal circumstances for an extension to be granted so that you are not perceived as having
gained an unfair advantage over other students who submit their work on ?me. You will generally
need documentary evidence to establish the nature of your circumstances.
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Students registered with Inclusion and Welfare – which supports students with disabili?es and
health condi?ons – who have a Reasonable Adjustment Plan may have addi?onal ?me indicated for
assessments. If an extension is required they should follow the condi?ons for a request for an
extension in this sec?on.
Late submissions and penal?es
This unit requires assessment items 2 and 3 to be submi?ed on Moodle. Students should be aware
that the assessment upload menu will record the ?me your assessment has been submi?ed. No
paper or email submissions will be accepted.
If a student fails to do their Tutorial Presenta?on in the week scheduled and has not been granted
an extension as per the condi?ons of this sec?on, they will be marked on a “Pass/Fail” basis,
meaning that the maximum grade given will be 64%, when the Presenta?on is made.
Supplementary Assessment:
Refer to the Assessment Policy and Procedures.
Academic Integrity
Students have a responsibility to uphold University standards on ethical scholarship. Good scholarship involves building on the work of
others and use of others’ work must be acknowledged with proper attribution made. Cheating, plagiarism, and falsification of data are
dishonest practices that contravene academic values.
To enhance understanding of academic integrity, it is expected that all students will complete the LearnOnline Academic Integrity Module
(AIM) at least once during their course of study. The module is automatically available as a listed site when students log into LearnOnline
(Moodle).
Use of Text-Matching Software
The University of Canberra has available, through LearnOnline (Moodle), text-matching software that helps students and staff reduce
plagiarism and improve understanding of academic integrity. The software matches submitted text in student assignments against material
from various sources: the internet, published books and journals, and previously submitted student texts. Click here for more information.
6. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
6a Learner Engagement
In order to get the most out of your studies, it is strongly recommended that you plan your time commitments, actively engage in class
discussions (online or face-to-face) and work with your peers as part of your study. The amount of time you will need to spend on study in
this unit will depend on a number of factors including your prior knowledge, learning skill level and learning style. Nevertheless, in
planning your time commitments you should note that for a 3 credit point unit the total notional workload over the semester or term is
assumed to be 150 hours. The total workload for units of different credit point value should vary proportionally. For example, for a 6 credit
point unit the total notional workload over a semester or term is assumed to be 300 hours.
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6b Inclusion and Engagement
It is strongly recommended that students who need assistance in undertaking the unit because of disability or an ongoing health condition
register with the Inclusion and Engagement Office as soon as possible so that reasonable adjustment arrangements can be made.
6c Participation Requirements:
A tutorial participation mark worth 10% of the overall marks available for the unit is part of assessment item 1.
6d Withdrawal:
If you are planning to withdraw please discuss with your Unit Convener. UC College students must also seek advice from the College.
Please see Withdrawal of Units for information on deadlines.
6e Required IT Skills:
Word-processing skills, effec?ve research skills through the use of the Library’s journals &
databases, use of the Unit’s Moodle site and PowerPoint or Prezi presenta?on skills. An
introduc?on to database and journal searching will be given in the lectures.
6f In-unit costs:
Note: To calculate your unit fees see: How do I calculate my fees?. The online UC Co-op Textbook Search is available for purchasing text
books.
6g Work Placement, Internships or Practicums:
None
6h Additional Information:
Use of Harvard or APA referencing system required.
7. STUDENT FEEDBACK

MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment 代写

All students enrolled in this unit will have opportunities to provide anonymous feedback on the unit at the beginning, middle and end of the
teaching period. This will be posted on your InterFace page at three stages of the teaching period. You can access InterFace through
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MyUC by logging in and opting for Moodle or InterFace. Your lecturer or tutor may also invite you to provide more detailed feedback on
their teaching through an additional anonymous questionnaire.
Changes to Unit Based on Student Feedback:
As an example of changes as a result of student feedback: students in 2013 indicated that they
thought tutorial par?cipa?on should be assessable so that students do not present to near empty
tutorial classes and this has been included in the 2016 Unit Outline. Con?nuing on previous year’s
success this has been included in 2017 Unit Outline.
8: AUTHORITY OF THIS UNIT OUTLINE
Any change to the information contained in Section 2 (Academic content), and Section 5 (Assessment) of this document, will only be
made by the Unit Convener if the written agreement of Head of Discipline and a majority of students has been obtained; and if written
advice of the change is then provided on the unit site in the learning management system. If this is not possible, written advice of the
change must be then forwarded to each student enrolled in the unit at their registered term address. Any individual student who believes
him/herself to be disadvantaged by a change is encouraged to discuss the matter with the Unit Convener.
© 2006 University of Canberra – Last updated April 13, 2017

MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment

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