MCD6050 Communications and Society

Monash College Diploma
Diploma of Arts
MCD6050
Communications and
Society
1
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Contents
Description ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2
Objectives ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2
English Language Outcomes ………………………………………………………………………. 3
Learning and Teaching ……………………………………………………………………………….. 4
Unit Schedule …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
Assessment & Feedback …………………………………………………………………………….. 7
Learning Resources ……………………………………………………………………………………. 9
Policies …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
Assessment Details ………………………………………………………………………………… ..13
Contact Details
Unit Leader:  Melanie Speldewinde
Phone:  03 990 58611
Email:  Melaine.speldewinde@monashcollege.edu.au
Team Leader:  Sarah Huaraka
Phone:
Email:  sarah.huaraka@monashcollege.edu.au
Reproduced and Published by:
Monash College Pty. Ltd.
Clayton, Victoria, Australia, 3800
© Copyright 2015
NOT FOR RESALE. All materials produced for this course of study are protected by copyright. Monash students are permitted
to use these materials for personal study and research only, as permitted under the Copyright Act. Use of these materials for
any other purposes, including copying or resale may infringe copyright unless written permission has been obtained from the
copyright owners. Enquiries should be made to the publisher.
arts-xxxx-uo-ddmmyy-v1.0-xx
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Description
The aim of this course is to provide the opportunity for students to explore what is meant by
communication, how one can study communication practices and policies, mass communication
technologies, and the significance that communication has to culture and society.
The underlying premise of this unit is that communication is an important aspect of contemporary life.
A simple definition of communication is that it refers to all the different ways in which humans interact
with each other through meaningful connection. Sometimes the meanings imparted through
conversation or advertising are intentional; sometimes they exceed what was intended and the symbolic
function of the message or object takes on a life of its own.
This unit provides a broad introduction to communications and media studies and its theoretical
traditions and concepts, with a particular focus on contemporary communications and media industries
and debates. It is designed to encourage students to apply their own individual and social contexts of
communications and media to key theories of the discipline. Individual lectures are directed to providing
basic theories and concepts within communications and media studies through an industry case study
approach.
Communication also impacts on our work, our leisure, our relationship to politics and economics, as
well as our friendships and intimate relationships. Many of these personal and social connections take
place through various kinds of communication technologies; and to be successful in either one’s
personal or professional life requires an understanding of what makes communication function
effectively. As such, industry, government and the community sectors, increasingly hire professionals
whose job it is to manage communication. It is one of the aims of this unit to get you thinking about the
history of mass communication technologies that will allow you to improve your understanding of the
many communication contexts you encounter. The study of communications is therefore not just a
theoretical enterprise; it also has a variety of practical applications. Whether your chosen vocation is
that of communication specialist: journalist, radio and television broadcaster, speech writer, on-line
blogger, research fellow or film-maker; or you feel that you would like to work in the music industry or
public relations, work in an NGO or volunteer as a guide at a museum, communication will be central
to what you do. The same applies to students who want to work in advertising, marketing, leisure and
tourism, sports management, commerce, design, politics, the public service, and other fields where
there is a high communication component associated with the tasks central to the occupation.
Objectives
When you have completed this unit, you are expected to:
• be able to employ techniques to generate ideas, overcome writer’s blocks, and structure
argumentation.
• have acquired or revised basic concepts of grammar, punctuation, spelling, use and style, and be
able to apply these in correcting faults and in developing exposition, authorial voice and
expression in essays.
• have developed research skills in relation to primary, secondary and tertiary sources, both in hard
copy and online sources.
• have developed professional practice in the skills of referencing, quoting, paraphrasing, and the
avoidance of plagiarism.
• have developed techniques of argumentation by studying logic, fallacies, and techniques of
persuasion and influence.
• have acquired skills in the genre of academic writing, such as expositional sequences, rhetorical
strategies, register, audience, and authorial voice.
• have developed skills in drafting, redrafting, editing and proofreading.
• possess a basic understanding of the field of communications
• employ basic concepts in the study of communications
3
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
• analyse the role of communications in processes of social and cultural change
• be able to apply communication analysis to everyday life
• be informed about areas of industry and community life where the study of communications is
applicable and relevant.
English Language Outcomes
Speaking
1. Perform effectively in English during a prepared presentation
2. Participate effectively in groups during discussions of unit related content in English
Listening
3. Listen to and mostly comprehend spoken English including academic language,
multimedia texts and classroom instructions
4. Use note-taking strategies to record information from spoken and multimedia texts
and show understanding
Reading
5. Use a range of reading strategies to comprehend written and visual texts including
textbook, multimedia texts and academic genres
6. Identify key information and produce accurate notes and summaries from written and
visual texts to demonstrate understanding of key concepts and ideas
Writing
7. Write substantial, coherent and accurate texts following guidelines provided
8. Produce short coherent written texts that appropriately respond to timed assessment
tasks
9. Support views with reference to literature, and by following academic conventions
University Skills & Australian Socio-cultural Awareness
10. Show effective independent research, critical thinking and learning skills
11. Show socio-cultural awareness of Australian university and global contexts
4
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Learning and Teaching
This subject is delivered by way of a 2 hour lecture and 2 x 1.5 hour tutorials. The lecture will present
and exemplify key concepts which will be expanded, clarified and discussed in the context of the weekly
tutorials. It is very important for students to attend ALL lectures, to be introduced to all assessments,
plus all the key concepts, ideas and arguments related to the weekly topics and readings.
Students will work in groups to cover the recommenced readings for each week; this is designed to help
students work through the key concepts and prepare them for tutorial discussions The tutorials will be
an interactive forum for students to raise questions and participate in discussions.
Students will be required to spend on average 5 hours per week attending lectures and tutorials, and 9
hours each week in private study. This will involve required readings in the preparation for, and
completion of, the various tutorial activities and major assessments.
There are a range of tasks that students will need to factor in as they prepare for the trimester, including
library access, correspondence with lecturer/tutor, reading and note taking, tutorial preparation,
planning, drafting of written assessments and exam preparation. Some tasks will be weighted more
heavily in different parts of the trimester, for example essay writing and the final examination.
Workload requirements
Tutorials will include on-line assessments, reading both articles and analysing the key arguments
presented by the authors, quizzes and watching some film excerpts and videos related to the weekly
topics.
Additional workload requirements
Refer to the unit guide for further reading for each week. This will help you plan the hypothetical
problem relevant to your oral presentation, have a draft of your writing for the Major Essay to present
for your tutor to check, have some questions to ask about the weekly topic.
Unit Schedule
Week Topic and Learning objectives Learning
Activities
1
Introduction to unit
2  The Press
1. What is the role of newspapers in how you find and read the news?
2. What are the differences between governments and the press in regulation
of the media?
3. Explain the changing business model of newspapers in the age of digital
media?
4. What are the links between media ownership patterns and influence of the
press on the public?
– Tiffen, R (2014)
– Simons, (2007)
3  Policy and Regulation
1. How does Cunningham characterise the approach of the ‘third way’ in
media and communications studies and how is it different from ‘critical
media studies’?
2. How far would you agree with Cunningham’s assessment. What has he
left out or misrepresented?
3. How are we to understand the three different approaches to the ‘public’ by
Bourdieu, Foucault and Habermas?
4. What kinds of argument do Bennet et al. put forward for continued public
involvement in broadcasting? Are their points still valid?
-Bennett, T,
Emmison, M & Frow,
J (1999)
-Cunningham, S
(2014)
5
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Week Topic and Learning objectives Learning
Activities
4  Film
1. How does cinema bring together older media forms?
2. What technological and production/business innovations led to emergence
of film industries in various countries and what challenge is posed by digital
production and online delivery today?
3. Account for the global ascendancy of the American film industry by the
1940s?
4. What are the alternative theorisations to the ‘cultural imperialism’
argument?
5. To what extent did an Australian film industry provide a local counter-note
in the 1970s and what policy initiatives since from government have
assisted the sustainability of local cinema?
6. What are some examples of Australian ‘transnational cinema’?
-Gorman, L & Mclean,
D (2009)
-Verhoeven, D (2014)
5  Radio
1. Explore the options for audio listening via digital audio subscriptions
services (Spotify, Radio, JB Hi Fi Now). Discuss costs and benefits of
these services in class. What, if any are the downsides of these services?
2. Do you listen to a radio station? Which one? Do you consider yourself a
loyal listener? What attracts you to that station? Music, personalities?
Information?
3. Have you tried to participate in a radio program? What was it for? Prizes?
To comment on something, eg via talkback? Describe your experience.
4. Do you use the social media services provided or other interactive or web
based services by radio broadcasters (eg Facebook pages of presenters,
podcasts from programs)? What do you use and why?
5. Have you ever been a volunteer in community radio station? Do you listen
to community radio? Describe your motivations for being a volunteer or
what you think is different about community radio broadcasting?
-Griffin-Foley, B
(2014)
-Lacey, K (2013)
5  Radio / Popular Music
1. How is popular music both a media and cultural industry?
2. Who are the broadcasting ‘gatekeepers’ in the Australian music industry?
3. What is a moral panic; give some music examples?
4. In regard to copyright systems, is the new streaming model viable?
-Horman, S (2014)
-Luckmans, S (2008)
6  Television
1. How do public service television models differ across different nations?
2. What roles should public service broadcasters play in the nation and
society today as we are digitalising?
3. How does digital TV change the way in which television is consumed and
produced?
4. Is there any concrete relationship between TV and the nation?
-Harrington, S (2014)
-Hartley, J, (2004)
7  The Internet
1. Was the development of the Internet (or something like it) inevitable, or
does it only exist because of the specific historical forces (such as the Cold
War and the San Francisco hippy ethic) that produced it?
2. Is censorship and regulation always damaging to online communication?
3. Dahlberg describes four ‘digital democracy positions’. Which, if any, of
these describes your views?
– Dahlberg, L (2011)
– Goggin, G (2014)
8  Video Games
1. Are some of the fears surrounding video games (e.g. game addiction or
the inculcation of violent behaviour) justified? Why/why not?
2. How is playing a game different from consuming other media, such as
reading a book or watching a television programme? How does interactivity
come into this?
– Goldsmith B (2014)
– Hjorth, L (2014)
-Newman, J (2002)
6
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Week Topic and Learning objectives Learning
Activities
3. Video games have begun to appear in prestigious art museums, such as
the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Can a video game be a work of
art?
4. How immersive can a game be? Is it possible to ‘lose yourself’ in a game?
What do you think video games will be like in 20 years’ time?
9  Social Media
1. If a person only knew you through social networking, do you think they
would be surprised by what you were like when they met you in person?
Why?
2. Are social media profiles a kind of ‘performance’? In what way?
3. Is bullying a greater problem in social networks than in schools or other
physical spaces? Why/why not?
4. How do you think you’ll feel about the information you currently make
public through social media in twenty years’ time?
– Boyd, d m & Ellison,
NB (2007)
– Burgess, J & Banks,
J (2014)
10
Privacy and Surveillance
1. What are some differences between the two concepts of privacy and
surveillance;
2. How can the practices of public surveillance impact on certain individuals
and groups which can lead to a lack of respect for citizen rights
3. How important is it for policy and regulatory bodies to develop a model of
informational privacy in terms of contextual integrity?
– Bowles, K (2014)
– Nissenbaum, H
(2004)
11  Sports Media
1. In what ways does sport matter in the study of media and
communications?
2. What does the term ‘media sport’ signify about the changing historical
relationship between sport and media?
3. Politics and sport should be kept separate. Discuss the legitimacy of
this popular claim made regularly in the media, considering the case of
the Olympics, the AFL and/or the soccer World Cup.
4. Citizens have a right to access sport for free on television. Do you agree
with this statement? Explain
– Majoribanks, T &
Farquharson, K
(2012)
– Rowe, D (2014)
12  Conclusion and Revision
Exam Revision
7
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Assessment & Feedback
Assessment is part of the learning and teaching process. Assessment fairly, validly and reliably
measures student performance of intended learning outcomes. Monash College Diplomas aims to
provide a learning environment where students receive ongoing feedback on their academic progress.
Assessment methods develop core discipline skills and professional competencies. Students receive
feedback on their achievements and areas for improvement prior to undertaking final assessments.
Feedback comes from teachers, your peers and yourself: it includes self-reflection, group discussions,
guided readings, interactions with teachers, and assessments.
Extensions for internal assessments need to comply with the Monash College Diplomas Special
Consideration Policy: http://www.monashcollege.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/17097/DIP-
Special-Consideration-Policy.pdf. Extensions can only be approved by the Team Leader.
Each year students can provide feedback on Diploma units through the Student Evaluation of
Teaching and Units (SETU) process. Student opinions are highly valued, and this feedback is used to
refine existing curriculum design and assessment tasks.
Turnitin – (Access from Moodle)
Turnitin is text-matching software which assists students with referencing and citing, and correctly
acknowledging the work of others.
Submitting a file to upload:
Click on the Turnitin assignment on the Moodle unit homepage, and follow the instructions on the My
Submissions page.
For instructions on using Turnitin go to:
http://vle.monash.edu/supporttraining/learnbytech/turnitin/submit-assignment-student.html
Online Submission of Assignments:
Click on the Assessment on the Moodle unit homepage, and follow the Submission Instructions on
the Assignment page. You will be required to read and accept a Student Statement before submitting.
You must keep an electronic copy of your assignment. We also recommend that you keep a
hard copy.
Online Assignment Feedback:
Your assignments need to be submitted on the due date, unless a prior arrangement has been made
with the Unit Leader or Team Leader.
Assignments will be returned online through Moodle. Students will be sent an email notifying them
that the marked assignment has been returned.
Assignment feedback will be provided to you within 2 weeks of assignment submission. Feedback
may include: a criterion-based assessment rubric; written comments within the body of the
assignment, and/or verbal feedback from your teacher. After marking, assessments will be returned to
students according to item 3.9 of the Monash College Diplomas Assessment Policy:
http://www.monashcollege.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/17101/dip-assessment-policy.pdf
8
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Assessment Schedule
Assessment Task  Details  Weight  Week Due
A1: Online Assessment
Individual  20%  2 -11
A2: Major Essay (2000 words)  Individual (Hurdle)  25%  10
A3: Tutorial Presentation  In pairs (Hurdle – Peer reviewed)  10%  2 -11
A4: Final Learning Statement  Individual  10%  12
A5: Exam  Individual, closed book (Hurdle)  35%  13-14
Requirements to Pass this Unit
In order to achieve a pass in the unit, you must achieve 50% or higher for your overall mark. Your
overall mark combines your internal assessment marks and your exam mark. If you receive a 49N
grade, you will automatically be awarded a 48N result.
9
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Learning Resources
Details of the prescribed and recommended resources for successful completion of this unit are listed
below.
Required Textbook
Compulsory requirement for passing this unit.
The following text book can be purchased from Monash University Bookshop, Clayton
Campus
• Cunningham, S & Turnbull, S, (eds.) 2014, The Media & Communications in Australia, 4 th
Edition, Allen & Unwin. ISBN: 9781743311639
• A Reader will be provided to students and weekly readings on Moodle.
Additional Readings/Resources
Books
• Cunningham, Stuart (1992) Criticism and Policy in Australia, North Sydney, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
• Frow, John & Morris, Meaghan (1993) Australian Cultural Studies: A Reader, St. Leonards,
NSW: Allen & Unwin.
• Turner, Graeme (2003) British Cultural Studies: An Introduction, 3rd Ed. NY: Routledge.
• Watson, James & Hill, Anne (1997) A Dictionary of Communication and Media Studies, (Fourth
Edition). London: Arnold.
• Williams, Raymond (1962) Communications, London: Penguin.
Journals
• Continuum, Media, Culture & Society, Media International Australia, Metro Magazine, Screen,
Screening the Past.
Websites
•  Media and Communication Studies website at http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Functions/mcs.html, a
series of links well worth exploring, on a wide range of media and communication topics.
•  mediastudies.com, at http://www.mediastudies.com/, a website providing links to news outlets and
educational material in media studies.
•  Voice of the Shuttle is a collection of links for most humanities disciplines, including media
studies, cultural studies, cyberculture and literary studies. Put together by staff in the University of
California, English Department, at http://vos.ucsb.edu/index-netscape.asp
•  Indigenous Media: http://caama.com.au/
10
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Learning Management Systems (Moodle)
Moodle is the name of the Learning Management System used for this unit to deliver learning
materials and other resources such as quizzes and discussions.
To access Moodle go to: http://mcpl.moodlesites.com and log in using your authcate username and
password. Once you are logged in, you will see the list of units you are enrolled in that use Moodle. If
you expect to see a unit in this list, and do not, please contact your lecturer.
Your lecturer will demonstrate how to use the Moodle site, and explain what is expected of you when
using Moodle, including any online assessment that must be completed. Please check Moodle
regularly so you will be kept up-to-date with important information for your unit as it becomes
available.
Library
The Monash University Library website contains details about your borrowing rights and how to search
the catalogues. To learn more about the library and the various resources available, please go to:
http://www.lib.monash.edu.au.
Katie Julian (katie.julian@monash.edu) and Samantha Helfrich (samantha.helfrich@monash.edu )  is
the subject librarian for Monash College at the Matheson Library, Clayton Campus. Katie can assist
you with finding research for your assignments, as well as the following;
• How and where to start researching for your assignment topic
• Effective use of online databases and the internet
• Finding and evaluating academic journal articles
• Searching the Library’s collections
• Citing and referencing
For your current and future studies, you will need to build your knowledge and skills around academic
searching, using databases, retrieving information and using correct referencing techniques. It’s a good
idea to refresh and update your skills before you start the assessment tasks. You can do this by
completing the tutorials available on the library website..
11
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Policies
Academic Integrity
Monash College is actively committed to preventing plagiarism, cheating and collusion for the
protection of the College’s reputation and standards for current and future students. Severe penalties
may be imposed on students who engage in, or who support other students engaged in, activities
which seek to undermine the integrity of the unit assessment process.
Definitions
Plagiarism: To take and use another person’s ideas and/or manner of expressing them and to pass
them off as your own by failing to give appropriate acknowledgement.
Cheating: Seeking to obtain an unfair advantage in an examination or in other written or practical
work required to be submitted or completed by a student for assessment.
Collusion: The presentation of work which is the result in whole or in part of unauthorised
collaboration with another person or persons.
For further information, refer to the 2.5 Late Penalties section of the Monash College Diploma
Assessment and Procedures Policy:
http://www.monashcollege.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/17101/dip-assessment-policy.pdf
Applications for extension of time to submit an assessment
If you require an extension of time to complete and submit your assessment task, you will need to
apply for special consideration.
Failure to submit an item of assessment by the due date without an approved extension of time will
incur a penalty
The Application for Special Consideration for In-Trimester Assessments form is available from:
http://www.monashcollege.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/17098/dip-special-consideration-
trimester-app-form.pdf
Students may also apply for special consideration if they believe that illness or other serious cause
has substantially affected their work during a teaching period or performance in an exam.
For further information regarding special consideration and penalties for late submission of an
assessment, refer to 2.5 Submission of assessed (non-test/non-exam) tasks section of the Monash
College Diploma Assessment and Procedures Policy:
http://www.monashcollege.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/17101/dip-assessment-policy.pdf
Attendance
Student attendance will be monitored to support students and to assist positive learning outcomes.
For further information refer to the Student Attendance Policy:
http://www.monashcollege.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/17087/DIP-Attendance-Policy.pdf
12
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Students with a disability
If you have a disability, medical or mental health condition that may impact your study, you can apply
for support to study at Monash College. Disability Advisers can individually discuss and arrange
reasonable adjustments to enable you to participate productively and independently in your studies.
For further information contact Disability Services:
Website: http://monash.edu/social-justice/disability
Email:  disabilityservices@monash.edu
Phone:  990 55704
Drop In: Social Justice Unit, Level 1, Gallery Building (Building 55), Monash University, Clayton
Campus.
For students based at Caulfield Campus, a Disability Adviser/Coordinator is available for personal
appointments on Wednesdays. Phone 990 55704 for an appointment.
Equal Opportunity
Monash College is committed to promoting equal opportunity for staff and students in employment,
education and service delivery in accordance with universal principles of equity, fairness and social
justice.
For further information refer to the Monash University Equal Opportunity Policy:
http://www.policy.monash.edu/policy-bank/management/student-comm-serv/equity-diversity/equal-
opportunity-policy.html
13
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Assessment Details
MCD6050 Communications and Society
Assessment 1: Online Assessment
Status: Individual
Weighting: 20%
Due date:  Weeks 2-11
Students are required to complete a set of online multiple choice and short answer preparation and
comprehension questions each week. Time for this will be provided in the tutorials.
Referencing requirements:
Some weekly activities will require some referencing, for example: A quiz will not require referencing,
but a research activity will require appropriate sources.
To build your skills in citing and referencing, you can access the online Harvard referencing styles;
http://guides.lib.monash.edu/citing-referencing/harvard – which can also be found at the
http://guides.lib.monash.edu/monash-college, a guide to library resources and services for Monash
College staff and students.
14
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
MCD6050 Communications and Society
Assessment 2: Major Essay
Status: Individual
Weighting: 25%
Word limit: 2000 words
Due date:  Week 10 – Friday, 9am
**This assessment must be submitted on Moodle AND uploaded to Turnitin.
Essay Questions
Answer ONE of the following questions. Your response should be a combination of your own
thinking, relevant scholarly work, and careful analysis of one key case study.
1. How has television consumption and distribution shifted in relation to digital platforms? Discuss
this in relation to Australian context.
2. Do you think video gaming will lead to the demise of older entertainment media such as novels or
films? Why/why not? Be sure to make reference to debates about the replacement of old media
by new that accompanied the arrival of previous entertainment technologies (for example the
television).
3. Discuss the relationship between print media ownership patterns and Australian government
policies, and the implications for media diversity.
4. Have social networking services such as Twitter made traditional news reporting obsolete?
Justify your response with reference to both some high-profile examples of citizen journalism and
traditional theories of the role of news media.
Learning objectives assessed:
This assessment is intended to assess
1. if you have developed a basic understanding of the field of communications;
2. can employ basic concepts in the study of communications;
3. can analyse the role of communications in processes of social and cultural change;
4. are able to apply communication analysis to everyday life;
5. are informed about areas of industry and community life where the study of communications is
applicable and relevant
15
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Presentation requirements:
Your Essay must:
1. Have a margin of at least 3 cm all the way around
2. Be spell-checked using an Australian dictionary (not an American dictionary). For example, use
‘organise’ as opposed to ‘organize’.
3. Have numbered pages
4. Use a legible 12-point font
5. Be 1.5 or double-spaced
6. Be submitted according to the online submission instructions provided below.
Referencing requirements:
This essay must use correct Harvard author-date referencing as explained here:
http://guides.lib.monash.edu/citing-referencing/harvard. Essays that do not adequately follow this
requirement may have marks subtracted or be given no marks at all.
A guide to library resources and services for Monash College staff and students to build your skills in
citing and referencing http://guides.lib.monash.edu/monash-college.
16
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
MCD6050 Communications and Society
Assessment 2: Major Essay –MARKING GUIDE
Criteria/
Weighting
1
FAIL
2
PASS
3
CREDIT
4
DISTINCTION
5
HIGH DISTINCTION
A: Introduction  Opening,
introductory
paragraph missing
Opening,
introductory
paragraph.
Rhetorical rather
than directly
related to the body
of the essay
Clear opening
paragraph that
discusses main issue
and orients the
reader to
organisation of the
paper
Strong and clear
introduction that
discusses the issues,
states the main point of
the essay, and orients
the reader to the
organisation of the
essay
Highly appropriate and
clear introduction to the
paper indicating a
sophisticated response to
the issue and providing a
clear outline of the
argument.
B: Literature  No use of unit
readings/ Fails to
understand core
concepts. Over-
emphasis on
examples.
Superficial use of
unit readings and
mention of core
concepts. Over-
emphasis on
examples.
Further reading
mainly padding of
the reference list.
Use of unit readings
applicable to the
topic but without
clear comprehension
of core concepts.
Further reading
mainly padding of the
reference list.
Good comprehension
of core concepts,
appropriate use of
examples, evidence of
appropriate further
reading.
Sophisticated use of core
concepts to analyse
examples and other texts.
Further reading chosen
well.
C: Argument
and Discussion
Construction of a
coherent
argument is
missing
Synthesis of
material to
construct a basic
argument; lack of
critical analysis
or independent
thinking
Balanced argument
with some critical
/independent analysis
of key readings.
Some use of premise
and conclusion
indicators.
Argument is well
structured and correctly
uses premise and
conclusion indicators.
Defines technical terms
and provides
independent reasoning
for positions taken.
Argument is tightly
structured and material is
synthesised and analysed
in a sophisticated
manner. Defines technical
terms and provides
independent reasoning
for positions taken.
D: Conclusion  Conclusion
paragraph missing
Concludes the
question in a basic
way
Good conclusion that
restates argument in
a concise manner
Strong and clear
conclusion that draws
together the argument
in a logical manner.
Strong and clear
conclusion that draws
together the argument in
a logical manner. Shows
subtlety in discussion and
sees limitations in the
argument.
E: Referencing
writing and
presentation
No or little use of
Harvard / use of
informal language
/ no or little
attention to
spelling, grammar
Some use of
Harvard / uses
mainly informal
language / many
errors in spelling,
grammar
Sound use of Harvard
/ use of some
technical language
correctly / poor
spelling, grammar
Accurate and consistent
use of Harvard. Clear
expression with correct
use of technical
language / few spelling
or grammatical
mistakes
All referencing and
format guidelines
followed to a publishing
standard. Clear
expression and precise
use of language with no
grammatical or spelling
mistakes.
17
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
COMMENTS:
MARK: /25 / % Grade
MARKER:
18
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
MCD6050 Communications and Society
Assessment 3: Tutorial Presentation
Status: Individual / Peer reviewed
Weighting: 10%
Due date: Weeks 2- 11
Details of task: All students are required to make a presentation to their class in which they
address a hypothetical problem in collaboration with one or more other students.
Topic Details:
1  Introduction to unit
2  The Press
The Melbourne Observer, a once-successful newspaper, has launched
an online edition but still isn’t making enough money to replace the
revenue lost by the decline in classified advertising. Most of its online
content is currently free, but maybe putting up a paywall would save
the newspaper’s finances. You are consultants hired to advise the
newspaper about its online future – is a paywall the right idea?
– Tiffen, R (2014)
– Simons, (2007)
3  Policy and Regulation
The Australian government has decided that current media ownership
laws are ineffective because so much of what Australians watch, listen
to or read is delivered by the Internet, which is unregulated and global.
Rather than giving up, however, the government has decided to
produce a series of public service announcements giving advice on how
to ensure a balanced diet of online media. You have been given the
task of designing the campaign; what practices do you think will
encourage people to get diverse, balanced and truthful coverage of
events in Australia and internationally?
-Bennett, T, Emmison,
M & Frow, J (1999)
-Cunningham, S
(2014)
4  Film
Excelsior Films, a major Hollywood movie studio, is reeling after a
series of costly box-office flops. Executives are desperate for a sure-
fire money-spinner to reverse the studio’s fortunes. Make a pitch for a
new film franchise that is based on existing intellectual property (e.g. a
toy, video game, book, board game, comic book, fast-food restaurant –
anything!) and set out all the possible revenue streams it could create
(e.g. product placement, merchandise, etc.), as well as its potential to
spawn a vast quantity of sequels and spinoffs.
-Gorman, L & Mclean,
D (2009)
-Verhoeven, D (2014)
5  Radio / Popular Music
Microsoft has decided to start its own streaming audio service, but it’s
going to have a tough time competing against the existing players. You
are consultants hired to come up with a new and exciting streaming
concept that will win listeners away from the likes of Spotify and Apple
Music. Make a pitch for your innovative streaming service.
-Griffin-Foley, B (2014)
-Lacey, K (2013)
-Horman, S (2014)
-Luckmans, S (2008)
19
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
6  Television
Currently, rights to television shows must be negotiated separately for
each national market. This arrangement is unpopular with viewers, but
lucrative for rights holders. It’s also a headache for Netflix, which has to
deal separately with its audience in each country. Netflix has hired you
to convince the big media corporations to adopt a system of global
television rights; how do you convince them to change?
-Harrington, S (2014)
-Hartley, J, (2004)
7  The Internet
You represent the government of the developing nation of Progeria.
Your citizens have almost no access to the Internet, but Facebook is
keen to deliver Internet.org, which will give them free access, but only to
a small group of Websites selected by Facebook (which, of course,
includes Facebook itself). Make a case for why Progeria should or
should not take up the offer
– Dahlberg, L (2011)
– Goggin, G (2014)
8  Video Games
You have been hired by a television network to create a video game
tie-in for television show. Which show do you choose, and how do you
play the game?
– Goldsmith B (2014)
– Hjorth, L (2014)
-Newman, J (2002)
9  Social Media
You are a group of entrepreneurs making a pitch for investment in your
new social networking service. Tell your audience why your product is
innovative enough to win people away from existing services.
– Boyd, d m & Ellison,
NB (2007)
– Burgess, J & Banks,
J (2014)
10
Privacy and Surveillance
The Australian federal government has decided to draft a new law
giving Australian citizens a ‘right to be forgotten’ on the Internet, and
you have been given the job of drawing up a list of situations in which
we do and don’t have the right to have online information about us
removed. Present your list and justify your decisions.
– Bowles, K (2014)
– Nissenbaum, H
(2004)
11  Sports Media
You are part of a new company that has created a virtual reality system
for enjoying major sporting events and need to sell sporting
organisations on its benefits. Select a particular sporting body (e.g. the
AFL, FIFA, the International Olympic Committee, etc.) and pitch your
product, explaining why sports fans will prefer a virtual reality sport
experience to attending events in person.
– Majoribanks, T &
Farquharson, K (2012)
– Rowe, D (2014)
12  Conclusion and Revision
Exam Revision
20
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
Presentation requirements: Presentations must be from 5 to 10 minutes long. They should
make use of a variety of media (hand-outs, posters, videos, slides, music, etc.).
• Presentations will be followed by an ‘open floor’ discussion chaired by the tutor. As such,
presentations should aim to open up class discussion.
• You should try not to simply read from the page for your presentation – we want you to learn to
‘speak to a paper’.
• You need to be well prepared and have a clear idea of what your main points are. You should
beware of trying to say too much. Clear and concise is the aim.
• You should draw upon your readings to make your arguments. You should also provide a media
text as an example (drawn from the reading) to illustrate the points you make.
• You are encouraged to use visual aids to help clarify the points you are making, e.g. relevant
images on y our slides to highlight key ideas
• The idea of the presentations is to explore the strengths and limitations of particular ways of
thinking about the topic and the reading, and to encourage class discussion. The presentation
should encourage the rest of the class to think about the strengths and limitations of the various
perspectives raised in the context of the presentation. These are the kinds of things that will be
taken into consideration when you are allocated marks for your presentation. Importantly,
students will be assessed on the basis of their ability to put forward a convincing argument
by drawing on the readings.
• Individual assessment in group tasks: Marks will be assigned through a combination of class-
and group-based peer review. All presentation group members will assess the contribution of their
collaboration.
Referencing requirements:
This essay must use correct Harvard author-date referencing as explained here:
http://guides.lib.monash.edu/citing-referencing/harvard. Essays that do not adequately follow this
requirement may have marks subtracted or be given no marks at all.
A guide to library resources and services for Monash College staff and students
http://guides.lib.monash.edu/monash-college.
Hints For Oral Presentations
Analyse your audience. How much do they already know about your topic? What is their level of
understanding of jargon? Are they going to be naturally interested, or do you need to do something
dramatic to get their attention?
1. Select one theme, and at the most two or three major points or concepts, based on your assessment
of your reading. It is MUCH better to be selective and really get that idea across, rather than try to
cover every aspect suggested by the topic.
2. Plan a variety of presentation modes (eg discussion, hands-on activity, questioning, lecture, dividing
the audience into ‘buzz’ groups, tests, videos) each taking no more than a few minutes.
3. Ensure you have a clear introduction, body and conclusion.
4. Be obvious in your material. You are familiar with it, but it may be the first time your audience has
heard about the topic.
5. Add up the time taken for your presentation and your activities. Will it all fit within the time limit?
What will you leave out if an exercise takes longer than expected? What will you include if you
suddenly find yourself at the conclusion with five minutes to go?
6. Use note cards to record the main points. Learn the opening words of each major point. If necessary,
have your presentation written out in full, but leave this on a table behind you.
21
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
7. Use no more than six points on an overhead transparency. Use a large font and lower case letters
which should be a least 0.5 cm tall.
8. Spell-check and proofread.
9. Rehearse beforehand in front of friends, family or a mirror.
10. Do not hide behind barriers. Move any tables/chairs between you and the audience.
11. Sign post your presentation. Introduce yourself. Have an overhead showing your presentation
outline. Refer to this overhead during the presentation so the audience clearly knows where you are
up to.
12. Look briefly at your hand-held cards, and then speak directly to members of the audience. DO NOT
SIMPLY READ OFF THE SLIDES/NOTES/CUE CARDS – these are only tools to assist you in giving
an interesting and coherent presentation.
13. Move around a little. Stepping forward creates rapport with the audience. Use the nervous energy
adrenalin gives you. Consider your nervousness a positive thing. It helps you think quickly. If you
have planned and practised thoroughly there is no need to be nervous.
14. Involve the audience. Ask them if they can relate to something you describe. Can they share their
experience about a particular media text/communication technology? Move them about to keep them
alert.
15. Don’t answer your own questions if the audience is silent. Give the audience time to think. Tell them
to discuss the issue with the person sitting next to them, and collect feedback in another three
minutes. Invite the audience to sum up during the session.
If you run out of time, don’t try to rush your presentation. Instead, edit ruthlessly on the spot. Be sure
to summarise at the end, relating to the achievement of your objectives.
22
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
MCD6050 Communications and Society
TUTORIAL PRESENTATION: MARKING GUIDE (PEER REVIEWED)
Topic: ____________________________________________
Criteria / Weighting
1
FAIL
2
PASS
3
CREDIT
4
DISTINCTION
5
HIGH DISTINCTION
A: Preparedness  Students do not
seem prepared to
present. They
frequently seem
unsure of their
material.
Students are
somewhat prepared to
present, but some of
their presentation
seems thin.
Students seem pretty
well prepared. They
have enough material
to fill their time
Students are well
prepared. It is clear
that they have worked
hard to develop their
ideas.
Students are
completely Prepared.
They have a great
deal of rich material
and well-thought-out
ideas to present.
B: Collaboration  One member of the
group seemed to be
doing all the work.
Both (or all)
presenters contributed
to the presentation,
although there was an
over-reliance on input
from one person.
All members of the
group were prepared
to contribute.
However, one member
tended to
dominate/stay in the
background.
All members of the
group contributed
more-or-less equally.
Questions were
fielded by everyone
and everyone seemed
aware of their role.
The members of the
group were highly
organised and worked
together well.
There was a tendency
to collaborate on each
part of the
presentation, rather
than dividing roles
between people.
C: Timing and
conclusion of
presentation
Does not conclude
on time. Does not
present a full
argument.
Does not conclude on
time, but provides a
rushed and basic
argument
Does not conclude on
time but summarises
the argument.
Concludes on time
and clearly develops
an argument.
Concludes on time
and clearly develops a
sophisticated and
persuasive argument
D: Entertainment
Value
The presentation
was unengaging.
Little effort was
made to entertain
the class.
An effort was made to
engage and entertain
the class, but this was
hampered by a lack of
planning and
preparation
An effort was made to
include interesting and
relevant material,
although more thought

莫纳什 MCD6050 Communications and Society 代写

could have been given
concerning how to
present it to the class
effectively.
Presenters addressed
the class confidently.
They had a good
selection of topical
material to present,
and made its
relevance to their
argument clear.
Presenters did an
excellent job of
involving the class in
their presentation.
They used a wide
variety of media and
made their relevance
to the presentation
clear.
E: Response to
audience
Cannot answer
questions.
Attempted to answer
questions and respond
to comments.
Addressed answers to
the tutor rather than
the questioner.
Answers to questions
reflected prior thought
about the strengths
and weaknesses of
the argument.
Addressed answers to
the tutor rather than
the questioner.
Acknowledged issues
that had not been
thought out.
Answers addressed
the questioner.
Answers to questions
displayed breadth
knowledge of the topic
beyond the
presentation. Sought
clarification of
questions or
comments not
understood, and gave
precise answers.
Acknowledged issues
that had not been
thought out.
Addressed the
questioner. Answers
to questions display a
sophisticated
knowledge of the topic
beyond the
presentation and
considerable thought
about the issue.
Sought clarification of
questions or
comments not
understood, and gave
precise answers.
Acknowledged issues
that had not been
thought out.
23
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
COMMENTS:
MARK: /25  / % Grade
MARKER:
24
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
MCD6050 Communications and Society
Assessment 4: Final learning statement
Status: Individual
Weighting: 10%
Word Limit: 500 words
Due date: Week 12
Details of task: At the end of the trimester, each student will submit a short piece of writing reflecting
on their learning experiences in the unit. Statements should summarise key learning experiences, and
highlight the ways in which they have informed students’ understanding of their personal relationships
with the media and communication technologies.
Presentation requirements: Your learning statement must:
●  Have a margin of at least 3 cm all the way around
●  Be spell-checked using an Australian dictionary (not an American dictionary). For example,
use ‘organise’ as opposed to ‘organize’.
●  Have numbered pages
●  Use a legible 12-point font
●  Be 1.5 or double-spaced
●  Be submitted on Moodle and must be the student’s own writing.
25
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
MCD6050 Communications and Society
Assessment 4: Final learning statement – MARKING GUIDE
Name: ___________________________________________
Criteria /
Weighting
1
FAIL
2
PASS
3
CREDIT
4
DISTINCTION
5
HIGH
DISTINCTION
A: Familiarity with
material
Demonstrates little
familiarity with
material taught in
the unit.
Shows limited
familiarity with material
taught in the unit, but
only engages with one
or two topics.
Reflects a broad
familiarity with material
taught in the unit,
although somewhat
lacking in depth.
Reflects a broad
familiarity with material
taught in the unit and
some independent
thinking about issues
raised.
Reflects a broad
familiarity with material
taught in the unit and
sophisticated
independent thinking
about issues raised.
B: Personal
reflection
Draws little if any
connection between
material in the unit
and personal
experiences.
Draws some
connection between
material in the unit and
personal experiences.
Demonstrates
substantial awareness
of connections
between material in
the unit and personal
experiences.
Does a good job of
relating material in the
unit to personal
experiences.
Draws strong
connections between
material in the unit and
personal experiences.
Demonstrates a
sophisticated
reflection on the
connection between
the two.
C: Structure  Little structure. The
statement lacks
clarity and
coherence.
Structure is loose and
would benefit from
more careful planning.
Evidence of some
planning of structure.
However, the
statement would be
clearer with some
further planning and
editing.
Statement is clear and
unified. There is a
logical flow of ideas,
and the relevance of
all material is clear.
Statement has a tight
and very effective
structure. It flows
smoothly from one
idea to another and
builds towards a clear
conclusion.
D: Presentation  No or little attention
to spelling,
grammar. Statement
may be significantly
too long or short.
Many errors in
spelling, grammar.
Statement may be
significantly too long
or short.
Poor spelling,
grammar. Statement
may be slightly too
long or short
Clear expression with
correct use of
technical language /
few spelling or
grammatical mistakes.
Statement is less than
50 words above or
below word limit.
Clear expression and
engaging use of
language with no
grammatical or
spelling mistakes.
Statement is less than
50 words above or
below word limit.
26
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
COMMENTS:
MARK: /20  / % Grade
MARKER:
27
Unit Outline
Diploma of Arts
monashcollege.edu.au
ABN: 064 031 714
CRICOS: Monash College Pty Ltd 01857J
MCD6050 Communications and Society
Assessment 5: Exam
Status: Individual
Weighting: 35%
Length: 2 hours (Closed Book)
Due date: Weeks 13-14
A two hour exam on the materials covered in this unit will be held during the Examination
The exam will assess Topics 2-11.
The use of additional material (e.g. notes, textbooks, course readers) will not be allowed during the
examination.
Students are to complete ten multiple choice questions (Section A). As well three short answer
questions (Section B) will be graded according to ability to:
(a) directly address the question;
(b) incorporate key ideas, concepts and debates discussed in lectures and tutorials;
(c) display evidence of individual analysis and thought about key concepts introduced in the weekly
readings
Some time will be dedicated to exam revision in the lecture and tutorials in Week 12.
莫纳什 MCD6050 Communications and Society

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