ECON847 INTERNATIONAL TRADE

Task 1 : Understanding the trade policy process and analysing its impact on stakeholders Analyse in 700-800 words the impact of the solar photovoltaic tariff imposed by the US in 2018 on the following groups: •  Solar Photovoltaic Cell and Module Manufacturers (and Workers) in the US; •  Solar Photovoltaic Cell and Module Manufacturers (and Workers) in the rest of the world; •  Solar Installation Companies (and Workers) in the US; •  Solar Panel Retail Consumers in the US; and •  Optionally, any other group(s) potentially identified as significantly affected by the tariff. Your discussion must reference the following: •  Moffett, Michael H. & Jonas Gamso, 2018, The Solar Photovoltaic Tariff of 2018, Thunderbird Case Series: A02-18-0009, Thunderbird School of Global Management (Also available on iLearn); •  Chapters/sections of the prescribed textbook relevant to lecture topics from weeks 8-10; or lecture slides from weeks 8-10; •  Two or more other reputable references from your own research.

澳洲Business代写:太阳能光伏电价国际贸易影响

ECON847 INTERNATIONAL TRADE
Econ847国际贸易assignment代写

Task 2: Understanding competing perspectives on the policy issue and deriving an independent position Discuss in 700-800 words whether the solar photovoltaic tariff imposed by the US in 2018 brings overall benefit to the world. Your discussion must: •  include your own educated judgement and the rationale(s) behind it; •  acknowledge competing perspectives on the tariff imposition and potential criticism against your judgement; and •  be consistent with your previous discussion for Task 1. Your discussion must reference the following: •  Moffett, Michael H. & Jonas Gamso, 2018, The Solar Photovoltaic Tariff of 2018, Thunderbird Case Series: A02-18-0009, Thunderbird School of Global Management (Also available on iLearn); •  Blinder, Alan S., 2019, “The Free-Trade Paradox: The Bad Politics of a Good Idea”, Foreign Affairs, Vol. 98 (1), 119-128 (Also available on iLearn); •  Chapters/sections of the prescribed textbook relevant to lecture topics from weeks 8-10; or lecture slides from weeks 8-10; and •  Two or more other reputable references from your own research.

ECON847 INTERNATIONAL TRADE

ASSIGNMENT

assignment

With the advancement of globalization and the popularity of the transnational companies, cross-cultural understanding is gaining its increasing importance in the operation and management of organizations, especially hybrid companies(Seligman 1999). As is known to all, it will be easier for colleagues from different cultural contexts to get along with each other if they have a good understanding of the culture of each other’s country.
Besides, there is no denying that culture can affect the formation of leadership in a company. Nowadays, with a growing number of Asian companies emerging in the world stage, more and more people are paying attention to Asian culture and leadership as well as the culture’s impacts on leadership.
This essay will have a look at the underlying aspects of Asian culture, including social relationships, Chinese Guanxi and face, that can affect the Asian leadership. Examples of the bribery of Rio Tinto and GSK China will be given in the essay
In conclusion, the Asian culture puts great emphasis on social relationships, Chinese Guanxi and Face very much which is originated from Confucianism. The importance of social status and hierarchical structure root deeply in Asian culture. Such a culture has greatly influenced the leadership in companies. The emphasis on social relationships in the culture results in leaders’ great attention to their interpersonal relationships and communication skills. The “Face ” culture leads to centralized decision-making process in companies and the Guanxi to the illegal phenomenon of bribery. The merits in Asian culture should be integrated into the leadership while the negative aspects should be abandoned. Trainings are needed to improve leaders’ cultural awareness so as to make them more able to deal with problems resulting from cultural diversity.

This essay will be divided into Part A and Part B on the basis of a case study to indicate how to make strategy when starting a business. A correct strategy can help to understand how to assign works to ensure members will play well in their roles

This essay will be divided into Part A and Part B on the basis of a case study to indicate how to make strategy when starting a business. A correct strategy can help to understand how to assign works to ensure members will play well in their roles.
Within the case, four university students have operated a baker business in their university. The current situation is that they need to reevaluate the existing strategy since operations cannot be well to deal with daily demands. Such kind of effectiveness also has let many customers feel disappointed. They hope to seek better solutions to deal with the current issue.
On the basis of requirements, it will firstly compare essential characteristics of partnerships, co-operatives and companies related to business structures:
Firstly, all of these three types have different functions to be used during operations for different purposes if people are dealing with businesses.
After the provision of relevant information in terms of different business structure and the understanding of the existing situation of Bio Breads, a manner suggestion is to use the partnership. Reasons will be listed as follows:
Firstly, when becoming a member within a partnership business network, it can ensure to improve the motivation practice during operations. The current urgent thing is to recover trusts of target customers to let them still believe they can be served timely. If Bio Breads can find a good partnership source and develop as its member party, it can ensure an entire good environment will help to improve the operational effectiveness. In such scenario, internal human capitals will be easy to encourage and they would understand clear about their behaviors will represent for the image of the brand. If they want to improve the current poor performance to compete for more customers, they should be more initiative and be collective oriented. However, when people are engaged, they can be more likely to think critically so that different viewpoints can be generated to give options to deal with one thing (Seitanidi, Koufopoulos & Palmer, 2010). To some extent, it can help to nurture new ideas and to improve the innovation ability.

Analysis on the use of CPM in business strategy management

Analysis on the use of CPM in business strategy management
Introduction
The purpose of this essay is to analysis whether Competitive Profile Matrix can create powerful visual catch-point tool and be the basis of the company’s strategy or not. In modern economic market environment, if an organization wants to stand firm in the fierce market competition, it should use strategic management (Brindza, Sprouse and Thompson, 2011). Therefore, there is always a need to expand and develop any tool adopted in strategic decision-making. Companies nowadays are trying to advance their traditional multi-matrix approaches in strategy analysis (David, 2009). The conventional matrices adopted in strategic planning and analysis can provide valuable insight towards a company’s future competition position.
A CPM can create the powerful visual and to convey information related to the organization’s potential competitive advantage (Raos and Sivaramakrishna, 2008). Generally, the critical success factors in a CPM include both the external and internal issues. The internal factors evaluation matrix will summarize organizations’ major internal weaknesses and strengths while the external factors evaluation matrix can essentially be a synopsis of the organizations’ external environment’s major threats and opportunities (Amason, 2011). They can help to impact the organization. In other words, internal factor and external factor evaluation matrices are able to allow the organizations to visualize their weaknesses, strengths, threats and opportunities while CPM utilize those critical success factors to compare itself to other competitors. In analyzing the past, present and future objectives of their competitors, organizations will be able to develop more strategic and comprehensive business plans that take advantage of their weakness and to promote their own strengths (Weerakkody and Reddick, 2013). However, different people hold different idea towards this point of view. Some professors regard CPM as the basis of a company’s strategy while some others were arguing that there are still many limitations. The following literature reviews will critically analysis the use of CPM in modern business management according to the past studies and researches.
Conclusions
This paper has attempted to conduct literature review and critical analysis of the using of CPM in business strategy management. Strategy management is something about to gain and maintain competitive advantages. It can also be defined as “anything that an organization does especially well when compared to its rival firms.” That is to say, when an organization can do something that its rival firms cannot do well, or the organization owns something its rival firm’s desire, it will represent as the organization’s competitive advantage. Poter (2008) mentioned that getting and keeping the competitive advantages is of great importance for long term success in the business development for an organization. The pursuit of competitive advantages can lead to the organizational success or failure. In other words, strategic management practitioners and researchers alike desire to better understand the nature and the role of competitive advantages in a variety of industries.
The use of CPM analysis does help organizations making effective strategies management for their business, but it still has some disadvantages people cannot ignore. However, if the organizations can take advantage of its strength and have clear idea of its shortcomings and try to avoid the passive effect of CPM, they can still get a lot of benefits from the analysis and make their business strategy management effective and appropriate. Normally, an organization can sustain the competitive advantages for only a certain period, because its rival firms can undermine and imitate the advantages (Jeschke, 2008). It is not adequate to simply obtain the competitive advantages. Therefore, an organization must strive to achieve the sustained competitive advantages. Firstly, it can continually adapt to the changes in both internal capabilities, resources and competencies and the external events and trends. Secondly, organizations can effectively formulate, implement and evaluate strategies which can capitalize upon those factors they analyzed. Thirdly, when an organization is doing CPM analysis for managing its business strategies, it is better if it combines the analysis with SWOT Matrix, Internal Factor Evaluation, External Factor Evaluation, Strategic Position and Action Evaluation and so on. Every strategy has to be made cautiously, because every step for organization’s moving forward is essential for business development. In a word, organization should be critical while conducting the CPM analysis for their business strategy promotion.

Business assignment

Business assignment

Executive summary
The environmental protection plan aims to improve the current practice of Toyota to better carry out its ethical business behaviors. The purpose is to hope the new environmental system to facilitate Toyota to be more environmentally friendly and improve the social reputation.
Toyota is a Japanese automobile brand and it has also been identified as the No. 1 vehicle brand in the world. In practice, the company has used various sales strategies to ensure diverse requirements of different customers in different segments markets can be satisfied. Still, Toyota strives to reinforce its environmental management to realize the sustainable development.
But it is essential to recognize that production for vehicles will bring more pollution problems. Without green awareness, it cannot ensure the company will be able to implement relevant social responsibilities initiatively. A healthy and safe world will be suitable for people to live, but companies should recognize that if they will not be initiatively to behave ethically, in most case, a great living environment will just be a dream (Blackburn, 2012). Therefore, it is quite urgent for decision makers to assess existing environmental performance within the company so that it will understand which advices will be beneficial and which advices maybe not appropriate.
Discussions of Government Policy
In conclusion, major objectives of Toyota’s new environmental policy will focus on improving the existing environment management to meet its Fifth Environmental Action Plan to maintain relationships with relevant stakeholders.
Leadership should display the powerful and ethical role to manage internal resources; employees should actively engage in their roles to contribute productively; existing CRM needs to be improved to better dealing with relationships with customers; SCM also needs to be enhanced to let Eco-techniques be integrated effectively; the participation of social activities need to be increased to compete for more support from the government when implementing the new environmental policy; in addition, social media can be relied on to let Toyota conduct more recycling educations.

mba assignment 

mba assignment

The following warning is issued by the University (Undergraduate Course Handbook: 2012.  You can access the Handbook at:

“One form of academic cheating is plagiarism: the reproduction of someone else’s words, ideas or findings and presenting them as one’s own without proper acknowledgment. There are many forms of plagiarism, including the following: 澳洲商科代写 mba assignment 代写

  • direct copying of sentences, paragraphs or other extracts from someone else’s published work (including on the Internet and in software) without acknowledging the source
  • paraphrasing someone else’s words without acknowledging the source
  • using facts and information derived from a source without acknowledging it
  • using ideas directly derived from an identifiable author without acknowledging the source
  • producing assignments which should be the student’s own, independent work in collaboration with and/or using the work of other people (e.g. a student or tutor).”

Plagiarism and copying the work of other students are forms of cheating and will be treated accordingly. Students found guilty of academic misconduct may receive penalties ranging from a requirement to participate in academic counselling or a reduction in marks for an individual piece of assessment for minor cases, through to suspension from your course in serious cases or repeat offences.
To ensure that you are not guilty of plagiarism you must, in all your written assignments, declare all sources from which you have obtained materials or ideas.

STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO FAMILIARISE THEMSELVES WITH THE RULES CONCERNING ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT

Further explanations for ‘academic misconduct’ and for ‘plagiarism’ are available at: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/learning/integrity.html.

7.1 Regional School of Business Policy on Plagiarism
The Regional School of Business aims to protect and enhance the authenticity and value of the degrees it offers.  Students are therefore reminded of the extremely serious view of the University with regard to plagiarism. All sources of information used in essays/assignments must be acknowledged fully in accordance with academic convention.
It is the responsibility of all students to ensure that they are aware of relevant academic requirements (e.g., accurate and correct referencing), and to seek assistance from staff where required. The above policy links provide relevant information about plagiarism, academic misconduct, and penalties that may apply.
Support and advice on fulfilling the School’s requirements with respect to the writing of essays/assignments is available from staff and the Academic Language and Learning Unit.

Plagiarism detection and prevention software (e.g., Turnitin) is used in the School to aid in identifying possible incidences of plagiarism in written assignments.

MBA assignment  help

MBA代写 assignment 代写 help
Challenges and difficulties in a variety of circumstances are not unusual during the years of university studies. If you are feeling pressure about anything, in the first instance see Student Services Officer (studentservices@auwho will give you some direction. If your problem is subject specific, and if your challenges and difficulties are seen to need other input, they will help you with a referral to another section of the University.

澳洲MBA代写 assignment 代写 help
Special Consideration is an equity measure to ensure that the assessment of students takes account of temporary adverse circumstances that impact negatively on individual students’ ability to demonstrate their learning achievements in an assessed task.

Students who consider that their performance in an assessed task was adversely affected by compelling or compassionate circumstances may apply to the University for Special Consideration. It is not a substitute for knowledge or skills you should have learned and because of this you will not be granted special consideration for your performance throughout a semester.

IMPORTANT NOTE
·             An application for special consideration does not guarantee that you will be granted a special examination or an adjustment to your results. The Committee reviews each application on an individual basis.
·              In most cases, you will NOT be given a second opportunity to sit an examination as a result of an application for special consideration. The Committee only approves second examinations in extraordinary cases.
·             If you do not submit your application on the Faculty of Law and Management’s Application for Special Consideration form then your application will not be considered.
·             If your application does not contain all of the information requested and the required supporting documentation then your application will not be considered.
·             If your application is not submitted within the required time frame after the due date of the assessed task then your application will not be considered.

If you believe that your studies have been adversely affected by illness or other factors experienced throughout the year you may apply for special consideration.

Special Consideration application forms are available on ACN Student Portal and should be lodged with an Academic Services Officer. It is important to note that submission of an application for special consideration means only that the difficulties referred to therein will be brought to the attention of the examiner(s) in the unit(s). It does not necessarily mean that special consideration will be granted.

Your application for special consideration must be made in writing, together with any medical evidence or such other evidence as may be applicable, prior to attending the examination for the unit(s) for which you are requesting special consideration.

If you consider that your performance during an examination has been adversely affected by illness or other cause immediately prior to, or in the course of, the examination, you may in the first instance; inform the supervisor at any time during the examination; and subsequently furnish in writing a statement containing the circumstances – together with any medical evidence by a registered, qualified medical practitioner or other such evidence as may be applicable no later than 72 hours after the time scheduled for the examination in question

What documentation should be included with the application?
If your application relates to illness on your part, it must be accompanied by a medical certificate which has been completed by a registered medical practitioner. The following principles will apply in the evaluation of applications involving medical certificates:
–          The medical certificate must be completed by a registered medical practitioner. The best way to ensure that this is the case is to ensure the certificate includes a Medicare Provider Number. (This is normally a 5 or 6-digit number followed by 2 letters). Certificates that do not include a Provider Number are not likely to be accepted.
–          The medical certificate must state that in the medical practitioner’s opinion you were or will be unfit to attend an assessment component or have been or will be adversely affected by illness. Medical certificates in which the medical practitioner reports that you claim to be unwell will not be accepted.
§  The medical certificate must cover the date on which the assessment is held.
§  Backdated medical certificates will not be accepted

If you are unable to complete an assessment component or your study is adversely affected due to a non-medical reason, you are encouraged to provide as much documentary evidence as you can to support your application. This should be objective evidence from an independent source.

Who should apply for special consideration?
·             A student who is unable to sit an examination due to illness or other cause.
·             A student who considers that his or her performance in an assessed task has been adversely affected by illness or other cause immediately prior to the due date of the assessed task.
·             Requests for special consideration must be for serious circumstances beyond the control of the student and will usually fall within the following causes:
–                      Serious illness or psychological condition – e.g. hospital admission, serious injury, severe illness, severe anxiety, or depression (not on-going conditions)
–                      Loss or bereavement – e.g. death of a close family member
–                      Hardship/trauma – e.g. victim of crime, sudden loss of income or employment, family relationship breakdown, severe disruption to domestic arrangements.

What outcomes are possible?
Applications will be assessed and will be assigned one of the following outcomes:
·                     reschedule an Assessment Task; or
·                     set a substitute Assessment Task; or
·                     allow extra time to complete an Assessment Task; or
·                     award a Reasonable Adjustment of Mark for the Assessment Task or subject for which Special Consideration is sought; or
·                     recommend that the Chief Examiners offer a formal Special Examination; or
·                     decide that there are insufficient grounds for the award of Special Consideration.

How should you make application for special consideration?
·         All of the information requested on the form must be filled out.
·         You must supply evidence of the reason you are applying for special consideration. For example, if it is medically related you must have a registered medical practitioner fill out the section in the Application form and sign it. Medical certificates must be completed by a registered medical practitioner. The best way to ensure that this is the case is to ensure the certificate includes a Medicare Provider Number. (This is normally a 5 or 6-digit number followed by 2 letters). Certificates that do not include a Provider Number will not be accepted. The medical certificate must state that in the medical practitioner’s opinion you were or will be unfit to attend an assessment task or have been or will be adversely affected by illness. Medical certificates in which the medical practitioner reports that you claim to be unwell will not be accepted. The medical certificate must cover the date on which the assessment is held.
·         If you are unable to complete an assessment component or your study is adversely affected due to a non-medical reason, you are encouraged to provide as much documentary evidence as you can to support your application. This should be objective evidence from an independent source. Documentation may include a death notice or certificate, a police report, a letter from an employer, a current letter from ACN Physiologist. If you have questions or concerns about documentation, see your Administration on your campus for advice. Students can contact academic@auscampus.net with queries about documentation.
·         You must lodge the special consideration form and the supporting documentation to your local Administration.

How will you know the outcome of your application?
The Committee’s decisions are emailed to your Latrobe University email address. Please check your e­mail for outcomes.

The following circumstances are not normally matters covered by special consideration:
·         If you need support because of a disability, mental health issue, or ongoing medical condition, this is not normally a matter for special consideration. For this type of long-term assistance, contact the Equality and Diversity Centre on your campus as soon as you become aware of the need for assistance and as early in the semester as possible.
·         If you have timetable clashes, exams scheduled close together, or more than the usual number of exams because you have been allowed to overload your enrolment, you will not be eligible for special consideration.
·         Special consideration will not be granted to accommodate travel plans, attendance at social events such as weddings, visits with relatives/friends or any discretionary activities.
·         Special consideration will not be granted because of avoidable issues related to visa requirements.

How would you best classify your business?

RESULTS
MBA assignment 代写 保证PASS
Extent to which businesses have been approached

§  It was found that the majority of respondents (74.1%) had never been approached by the Bendigo Easter Festival Committee to support the Bendigo Easter Festival.

Has your business ever been approached to support the BEF?

MBA assignment 代写 保证PASS

Classification of the businesses interviewed

§  The results of the survey showed that the majority of the businesses interviewed were either retailers (62.1%) or service providers (31.8%).

                  How would you best classify your business?

MBA assignmentPASS

Location of the respondents in Bendigo

§         The graph shows that a great majority of the respondents were situated in the Bendigo CBD (41.1%) or in the outskirts of Bendigo (38.5%)

Size of the businesses interviewed

§  The results of the research investigation indicate that the respondents were mainly small firms of less than 20 employees (88.6 %).

§  Medium and large organisations (more than 100 employees) only represent only 11.4% of the sample population

MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment

MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment 代写

7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra

http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 1/20
Expand All | Collapse All
MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY (9027|3)
Click on the sections below to view the information. Click Expand All to read all
information. To view a printable version of the Unit Outline click on Print this page. To save the Unit Outline as a
PDF click on Print this page, then use your browser’s Print function to save to PDF.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY
The University of Canberra acknowledges the Ngunnawal peoples as the traditional custodians of the land upon which the University’s
main campus sits, and pays respect to all Elders past and present.
INTRODUCTION
This Unit Outline must be read in conjunction with:
a. UC Student Guide to Policies, which sets out University-wide policies and procedures, including information on matters such as
plagiarism, grade descriptors, moderation, feedback and deferred exams, and is available at http://www.canberra.edu.au/current-
students/student-policies.
b. Any additional information specified in section 6.
1. CORE UNIT DETAILS
Unit Code and Version: 9027|3
Unit Title: Media, Technology and Society
Unit Level: 1
Owning Faculty/Section: Faculty of Arts and Design
UC Discipline/Section: Discipline of Communication and Media
Enrolled Credit Points: 3
Unit Offering Details:
Semester 2, 2017, ON-CAMPUS, BRUCE (164832)
For an explanation of delivery modes see Unit Modes of Delivery Titles.
Unit Convener Name and Contact Details:
Anji Perera
Email: Anji.Perera@canberra.edu.au
Telephone: 02 6201 2575
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 2/20
Administrative Contact Details:
Room 9C6
(02) 6201 2475
FADadmin@canberra.edu.au
2. ACADEMIC CONTENT
Unit Description
This unit examines the relationship between technology and human society within the context of media and how media represents and
influences society’s political, cultural and institutional systems. Media technology is viewed as a central organising theme in society in
shaping Australian democracy and politics. This unit is designed to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the
broader Australian culture of which it is a part. Topics to be covered include recent trends in the news media, theories of attitude formation
and change, the role of sources in the construction of the news, the economics of news production and consumption, the ways in which
the news shapes the public’s perceptions of the political world, campaign communication, and the general role of the mass media in the
democratic process.
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. demonstrate a firm understanding of multiple methods and approaches by which
to assess technology in various social and political terms;
2. demonstrate an understanding of the various ways by which to assess the mutual relationship between society and technology;
3. demonstrate an awareness of ethics and citizenship via current issues in media and politics;
4. apply analytical tools to identify a societal or ethical problem resulting from the use of technologies.
Graduate Attributes
1. UC graduates are professional – communicate effectively
1. UC graduates are professional – display initiative and drive, and use their organisation skills to plan and manage their workload
1. UC graduates are professional – use creativity, critical thinking, analysis and research skills to solve theoretical and real-world
problems
2. UC graduates are global citizens – think globally about issues in their profession
2. UC graduates are global citizens – understand issues in their profession from the perspective of other cultures
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – be self-aware
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – evaluate and adopt new technology
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – reflect on their own practice, updating and adapting their knowledge and skills for continual
professional and academic development
Skills Development
As students of the University of Canberra, you will develop your critical thinking skills, your ability to solve complex problems, your ability
to work with others, your confidence to learn independently, your written communication skills, your spoken communication skills and a
number of work-related knowledge and skills.
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 3/20
Prerequisite
Not Specified.
Co-requisite
Not Specified.
3. TIMETABLE OF ACTIVITIES
Week Date Lecture Readings Assessment
1 7 August
Introductory lecture:
Overview of unit,
assessment
requirements and
library research skills
session
No tutorials in
Week 1
Unit Outline – available on the Unit’s Moodle site.
What’s the best, most effective way of taking notes?, Getting
the most from lectures and Tutorial Participation available on
the Unit’s Moodle site. There is a range of other material on the
Unit’s Moodle site to assist you with study skills & to perform
well in this uni.
2 14 August
Media matters &
effects: theories and
methods
Tutorials
commence. Sign up
for reading
presentations.
Cunninghan, S. & Turner, G. (Eds) (2010). Introduction: the
media and communications today. In The media and
communications in Australia (pp.1-11). Crows Nest, NSW: Allen
& Unwin.
Kellner, D. (2009). Chapter 1: Towards a critical media/cultural
studies. In R. Hammer & D. Kellner (Eds) Media/cultural
studies: critical approaches (pp.1-24). New York: Peter Lang.
3 21 August
Media effects case
study
Text-based news:
agenda setting &
framing
Tutorial reading
presentations
commence.
McQuail, D. (2005). Chapter 17: Processes and models of
media effects. In McQuail’s mass communication theory (pp.
455-478). London: Sage.
Balnaves, M. (2009). Chapter 4: Classics in Media and Effects.
In Media theories and approaches: a global perspective (pp.
57-83). Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan
Valkenburg, P. M., & Peter, J. (2013). The differential
susceptibility to media effects model. Journal of
Communciation, 63(2), 221-243. doi:10.1111/jcom.12024
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
4 28 August Reading media
messages (i):
semiotics & signs
Tewksbury, D. & Scheufele, D. (2009). Chapter 2: News
framing theory and research. In J. Bryant & M. B. Oliver
(Eds) Media effects: advances in theory and research (pp.17-
33). New York: Routledge.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 4/20
Wiest, J.B. (2017). Entertaining genius: U.S. media
representations of exceptional intelligence. Mediatropes, 6(2),
148-170.
Walsh, C. (2015). Media capital or media deficit?:
Representations of women in leadership roles in old and new
media. Feminist Media Studies, 15(6), 1025-1034.
doi:10.1080/14680777.2015.1087415
5 4 September
Reading media
messages (ii):
ideology &
hegemony
O’Shaughnessy M., & Stadler, J. (Eds). (2008). Chapters 8 & 9
(partial). In Media & society (pp.133-148;153;156-161), South
Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.
Schirato, T., Buettner, A., Jutel, T., & Stahl, G. (2010).
Analysing the media: theories, concepts and techniques.
In Understanding media studies (pp.27-49). Melbourne,
Australia: Oxford University Press.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
6 11 September
Theorising
audiences: citizens,
consumers,
commodities, users
O’Shaughnessy M., & Stadler, J. (Eds). (2008). Chapters 11 &
13 (partial). In Media & society (pp.173-180; 197-215). South
Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.
North, L. (2009). ‘Blokey’ newsroom culture. Media International
Australia, 132(Aug), 5-15
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
7 18 September
Media economics:
understanding the
economic paradigms
in media industries
Figueiredo, B. (2016). Imagining the global: Transnational
media and popular culture beyond east and west. Consumption
Markets and Culture, 1-4.doi:10.1080/10253866.2016.1161744
Nitoiu, C. (2015). Supporting the EU’s approach to climate
change: The discourse of the transnational media within the
‘brussels bubble’. Journal of European Integration, 37(5), 535-
552. doi:10.1080/07036337.2015.1019879
Webster, J. & Phalen, P. (1994). Chapter two. Victim, consumer
or commodity? Audience models in communication policy. In J,
Ettema. & C. Whitney (Eds), Audiencemaking. Thousand Oaks,
CA: Sage.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
8 25 September No lecture/tutorial
Class free week.
Assessment Item 2: Analysis of
news representation of academic
research due 5pm Wednesday
27 September. Submission via
Moodle dropbox.
9 2 October
Text content
industries:
newspapers & books
(Online lecture due
to public holiday on
Monday)
Albarran, A. (2010). Chapter Three: Key concepts to
understanding the media economy. In A. Alberran, The Media
Economy. New York: Routledge.
Napoli, P. (2009). Chapter 12. Media economics and the study
of media industries. In J. Holt. & A. Peren (Eds), Media
industries: history, theory and method. West Sussex, UK:
Wiley-Blackwell.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
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10 9 October Platform industry:
television
Tapscott, D. & Williams, A. D. (2010). Chapter 11. The demise
of the newspaper and the rise of the new news. In D. Tapscott
& A. D. Williams, Macrowikinomics: Rebooting the Business
and the World. London: Atlantic Books.
Carr, N. (2010). Chapter 6. The very image of a book. In The
Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains. London:
W.W. Norton & Company.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
11 16 October
The internet changes
everything…or does
it?
Networked “new”
media, digital divide
and performance
identities
(Guest lecture)
Comer, J., & Wikle, T. (2015). Access to locally oriented
television broadcasting in a digital era. Applied Geography, 60,
280-287. Doi:10.1016/j.apgeog.2014.11.001
Doyle, G. (2016). Resistance of channels: Television
distribution in the multiplatform era. Telematics and Informatics,
33(2), 693-702. Doi:10.1016/j.tele.2015.06.015
Doyle, G. (2016). Digitization and changing windowing
strategies in the television industry: negotiating new windows
on the world. Television & New Media, 17(7), 629-645.
doi:10.1177/1527476416641194
Doyle, G. (2002). Chapter four. Television Broadcasting.
In Understanding Media Economics. London: Sage
Publications.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
12 23 October
Political imagery &
performance
(Guest lecture)
Broadbent, R., & Papadopoulos, T. (2013). Bridging the digital
divide – an Australian story. Behaviour and Information
Technology, 32(1), 4-13. doi:10.1080/0144929X.2011.572186
Senft, T. M. (2013) Chapter 22: Microcelebrity and the branded
self. In J. Hartley, J. Burgess & A. Bruns (Eds), A companion to
new media dynamics (pp.346-354). Chichester, Malden, MA :
John Wiley & Sons.
Errington, W. & Miragliotta, N. (2007). Chapter 10: New media
and the prospects for democracy. In Media and Politics: an
introduction (pp.182-201). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford
University Press.
Supplementary readings:
Baker, C.E. (2007). Chapter 3: Not a real problem: the market
or the internet will provide. In Baker, C.E. Media concentration
and democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Zollers, A. (2009). Critical perspectives on social network sites.
Media/cultural studies (pp. 602-614). New York: Peter Lang.
Assessment 1tutorial presentations:
ongoing weekly activity
13 30 October
Summary & review
(No tutorials and
lecture this week.
Work on Assessment
3)
Craig, G (2004) Chapter 6 ‘Political image and performance’.
In The Media, politics and public life (pp.112-129). Crows
News, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
Sanders, K (2009) Symbolic politics: “all the world’s a stage”.
In Communicating politics in the 21 st century, (pp.40-54).
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan
Assessment Item 3:
Media/technology essay due 5pm
on Sunday 5 November.
Submission via Moodle dropbox.
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4. UNIT RESOURCES
4a List of Required Texts/Readings:
Week one:
Unit Outline.
What’s the best, most effective way to take notes? Getting the most from lectures and Tutorial Participation available on the Unit’s Moodle
site. There is a range of other material on the Unit’s Moodle site to assist you with study skills & to perform well in this unit.
Week two:
Cunninghan, S. & Turner, G. (Eds) (2010). Introduction: the media and communications today. In The media and communications in
Australia (pp.1-11). Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
Kellner, D. (2009). Chapter 1: Towards a critical media/cultural studies. In R. Hammer & D. Kellner (Eds) Media/cultural studies: critical
approaches (pp.1-24). New York: Peter Lang.
Week three:
McQuail, D. (2005). Chapter 17: Processes and models of media effects. In McQuail’s mass communication theory (pp. 455-478).
London: Sage.
Balnaves, M. (2009). Chapter 4: Classics in Media and Effects. In Media theories and approaches: a global perspective (pp. 57-83).
Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan
Valkenburg, P. M., & Peter, J. (2013). The differential susceptibility to media effects model. Journal of Communciation, 63(2), 221-243.
doi:10.1111/jcom.12024
Week four:
Tewksbury, D. & Scheufele, D. (2009). Chapter 2: News framing theory and research. In J. Bryant & M. B. Oliver (Eds) Media effects:
advances in theory and research (pp.17-33). New York: Routledge.
Wiest, J.B. (2017). Entertaining genius: U.S. media representations of exceptional intelligence. Mediatropes, 6(2), 148-170.
Walsh, C. (2015). Media capital or media deficit?: Representations of women in leadership roles in old and new media. Feminist Media
Studies, 15(6), 1025-1034. doi:10.1080/14680777.2015.1087415
Week five:
O’Shaughnessy M., & Stadler, J. (Eds). (2008). Chapters 8 & 9 (partial). In Media & society (pp.133-148;153;156-161), South Melbourne,
VIC: Oxford University Press.
Schirato, T., Buettner, A., Jutel, T., & Stahl, G. (2010). Analysing the media: theories, concepts and techniques. In Understanding media
studies (pp.27-49). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.
Week six:
O’Shaughnessy M., & Stadler, J. (Eds). (2008). Chapters 11 & 13 (partial). In Media & society (pp.173-180; 197-215). South Melbourne,
VIC: Oxford University Press.
North, L. (2009). ‘Blokey’ newsroom culture. Media International Australia, 132(Aug), 5-15
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
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Week seven:
Figueiredo, B. (2016). Imagining the global: Transnational media and popular culture beyond east and west. Consumption Markets and
Culture, 1-4.doi:10.1080/10253866.2016.1161744
Nitoiu, C. (2015). Supporting the EU’s approach to climate change: The discourse of the transnational media within the ‘brussels bubble’.
Journal of European Integration, 37(5), 535-552. doi:10.1080/07036337.2015.1019879
Webster, J. & Phalen, P. (1994). Chapter two. Victim, consumer or commodity? Audience models in communication policy. In J, Ettema. &
C. Whitney (Eds), Audiencemaking. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Week nine:
Albarran, A. (2010). Chapter Three: Key concepts to understanding the media economy. In A. Alberran, The Media Economy. New York:
Routledge.
Napoli, P. (2009). Chapter 12. Media economics and the study of media industries. In J. Holt. & A. Peren (Eds), Media industries: history,
theory and method. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
Week ten:
Tapscott, D. & Williams, A. D. (2010). Chapter 11. The demise of the newspaper and the rise of the new news. In D. Tapscott & A. D.
Williams, Macrowikinomics: Rebooting the Business and the World. London: Atlantic Books.
Carr, N. (2010). Chapter 6. The very image of a book. In The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains. London: W.W. Norton &
Company.
Week eleven:
Comer, J., & Wikle, T. (2015). Access to locally oriented television broadcasting in a digital era. Applied Geography, 60, 280-287.
Doi:10.1016/j.apgeog.2014.11.001
Doyle, G. (2016). Resistance of channels: Television distribution in the multiplatform era. Telematics and Informatics, 33(2), 693-702.
Doi:10.1016/j.tele.2015.06.015
Doyle, G. (2016). Digitization and changing windowing strategies in the television industry: negotiating new windows on the world.
Television & New Media, 17(7), 629-645. doi:10.1177/1527476416641194
Doyle, G. (2002). Chapter four. Television Broadcasting. In Understanding Media Economics. London: Sage Publications.
Week twelve:
Broadbent, R., & Papadopoulos, T. (2013). Bridging the digital divide – an Australian story. Behaviour and Information Technology, 32(1),
4-13. doi:10.1080/0144929X.2011.572186
Senft, T. M. (2013) Chapter 22: Microcelebrity and the branded self. In J. Hartley, J. Burgess & A. Bruns (Eds), A companion to new media
dynamics (pp.346-354). Chichester, Malden, MA : John Wiley & Sons.
Errington, W. & Miragliotta, N. (2007). Chapter 10: New media and the prospects for democracy. In Media and Politics: an
introduction (pp.182-201). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.
Week twelve supplementary readings:
Baker, C.E. (2007). Chapter 3: Not a real problem: the market or the internet will provide. In Baker, C.E. Media concentration and
democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
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Due Date:
Weighting Percentage:
Zollers, A. (2009). Critical perspectives on social network sites. Media/cultural studies (pp. 602-614). New York: Peter Lang.
Week thirteen:
Craig, G (2004) Chapter 6 ‘Political image and performance’. In The Media, politics and public life (pp.112-129). Crows News, NSW: Allen
& Unwin.
Sanders, K (2009) Symbolic politics: “all the world’s a stage”. In Communicating politics in the 21 st century, (pp.40-54). Houndmills,
Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan
4b Materials and Equipment:
None
4c Unit Website:
To find your unit website online, login to LearnOnline (Moodle) using your student ID.
Note that LearnOnline (Moodle) has a profile page that displays your name and email address for the benefit of other students. If you
prefer to hide your email address, click here for instructions.
The unit Moodle site URL is: http://learnonline.canberra.edu.au/course/view.php?id=18515
5A. ASSESSMENT ITEM DETAILS
Click on an Assessment Item for more details.
Tutorial reading presenta?on & par?cipa?on
From Week 3 – 12
30
Addresses learning outcome(s):
On completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. demonstrate a firm understanding of multiple methods and approaches
by which to assess technology in various social and political terms;
2. demonstrate an understanding of the various ways by which to assess the mutual relationship between society and
technology;
Related graduate attribute(s):
1. UC graduates are professional – communicate effectively
1. UC graduates are professional – use creativity, critical thinking, analysis and research skills to solve theoretical and real-
world problems
2. UC graduates are global citizens – think globally about issues in their profession
2. UC graduates are global citizens – understand issues in their profession from the perspective of other cultures
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – evaluate and adopt new technology
Due date Weekly ac?vi?es from Week 3 – 12
Purpose The purpose of the presenta?on is to provide a summary and analysis of the
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key concepts and ideas contained in the reading, including ques?ons and/or
discussion points for the tutorial class.
The purpose of tutorial par?cipa?on is to demonstrate engagement with the
reading and Unit ideas and concepts. There is an expecta?on that students
will a?end and par?cipate in all tutorials. This is because par?cipa?on
through a?endance is an important and significant component of mee?ng
the learning outcomes of the unit.
Process In Week 2 tutorials each student will be allocated a reading from the list of
weekly readings presented in the Timetable of Ac?vi?es and available
through the Unit’s Moodle site.
What to
prepare &
present
All students should sign-up for a Tutorial Presenta?on in the Week 2 tutorial.
The nominated student for the reading each week should prepare a
presenta?on that includes:
b.  a summary of the key ideas/concepts from the reading (5-
10 minutes);
c.  an analysis of the key ideas/concepts and applica?on of these to
appropriate and relevant current examples consistent with the course’s
themes and topics. For example, to what extent do the reading’s ideas
help to understand and explain current events and examples within
media, technologies & society? (5-10 minutes); and
d.  discussion points and ques?ons for tutorial members. This will be the
base for discussion in class that week (5-10 minutes). For example, what
are some of the tensions/areas of debate currently in this area? Who is
on which side of the debate and how does the reading’s ideas help us to
understand these areas of difference?
The minimum/maximum ?me limit for a presenta?on is between 20-
30 minutes, including ?me for discussion by tutorial members and no
presenta?on should be longer than 30 minutes.
Given the length and complexity of some of the readings, students may
choose either to:
a.  present a summary of all the key ideas/concepts contained in the
reading and focus on a few (1-3) for analysis and applica?on (summarise
all key ideas/concepts and analyse/apply a few) then facilitate
discussion with ques?ons; or
b.  focus on only a few (1-3) key ideas/concepts for summary, analysis
applica?on (summarise a few key ideas/concepts and analyse/apply a
few) then facilitate discussion with ques?ons.
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Due Date:
Weighting Percentage:
All students are expected to par?cipate in the in-class discussion by:
a.  reading the relevant readings available on Moodle;
b.  a?ending/listening to the relevant lecture prior to the tutorial;
c.  thinking about the reading material and its implica?on for media and
communica?on professional prac?ce and in rela?on to the course’s
themes; and
d.  par?cipa?ng in tutorial discussions.
Wri?en reports will not be accepted as a subs?tute for missed tutorial
a?endance and par?cipa?on.
Marking
criteria
Taking into account the length and complexity of the reading and the
student’s decision to cover all/a few of the key ideas/concepts, presenta?ons
will be marked on the following criteria which are weighted equally and
comprises 20% of the value of this assessment item:
a.  Selec?on and summary of key ideas/concepts;
b.  Analysis and applica?on of key ideas/concepts with appropriate and
relevant examples, in the context of the course’s themes & topics;
c.  Presenta?on skills including oral communica?on skills and use of visual
media;
d.  Engagement with audience including discussions ques?ons and/or
ac?vi?es; and
e.  Time management.
The marking template for tutorial presenta?ons is available on the Unit’s
Moodle site.
Tutorial par?cipa?on will be assessed by evidence of having read the weekly
readings and evidence of cri?cal engagement with the reading material and
with ideas & concepts presented in the Unit. This part of the assessment
comprises 10% of your overall unit grade and will be included in the final
grade for this assessment item when uploaded to the Unit’s Moodle site. A
descrip?on of Tutorial Par?cipa?on Grades is available on the Unit’s Moodle
site.
Analysis of news representa?on of academic research
5pm Wednesday 27 September (Week 8) Submission via Moodle dropbox
30
Addresses learning outcome(s):
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On completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. demonstrate a firm understanding of multiple methods and approaches
by which to assess technology in various social and political terms;
2. demonstrate an understanding of the various ways by which to assess the mutual relationship between society and
technology;
3. demonstrate an awareness of ethics and citizenship via current issues in media and politics;
4. apply analytical tools to identify a societal or ethical problem resulting from the use of technologies.
Related graduate attribute(s):
1. UC graduates are professional – communicate effectively

MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment 代写

1. UC graduates are professional – display initiative and drive, and use their organisation skills to plan and manage their
workload
1. UC graduates are professional – use creativity, critical thinking, analysis and research skills to solve theoretical and real-
world problems
2. UC graduates are global citizens – understand issues in their profession from the perspective of other cultures
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – reflect on their own practice, updating and adapting their knowledge and skills for
continual professional and academic development
Purpose The purpose of this assessment is for you to analyse news media
representa?ons of academic research using Unit concepts, the differences
between quan?ta?ve and qualita?ve research methods and assess the
news representa?on against values of accuracy, objec?vity and balance.
Process The assessment is carried out in a number of stages:
1.  Choose one of the 3 news media ar?cles available on the Unit’s
Moodle site at Week 8.
2.  From informa?on contained in the news report on the academic
research create a set of keywords to help you guide your search for
the research ar?cle. Ar?cle and database searching will be presented
in lectures.
3.  Using your set of keywords search the journal databases to which the
library university has access. Find the original research ar?cle and use
Ulrichsweb to ascertain if the academic journal is peer-reviewed.
4.  Cri?cally analyse (compare/contrast & evaluate) the representa?on of
the research in the news ar?cle. Examine whether there are news
frames, narra?ves, ideologies and/or hegemonic ideas/values present
in the news ar?cle representa?on of the academic research and/or
par?cular news frames evident and cri?cally reflect upon the
presence/use of these. Argue whether or not the research has been
represented accurately, objec?vely and in a balanced manner in the
news ar?cle. Discuss whether qualita?ve and quan?ta?ve research
methods were used and whether this is represented in the
newspaper/magazine/online ar?cle. Indicate whether the academic
research is peer-reviewed or not.
5.  Include a minimum of 3 addi?onal references from the Unit’s readings
in addi?on to the academic research and news media pieces in your
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analysis. References are not included in the word count. Use either the
Harvard or APA referencing systems. NB: no footnotes or endnotes.
Here is the link to the referencing guides made available by the UC
Library h?p://canberra.libguides.com/referencing
At the end of your piece include a list of References only of material cited
in your essay. Do not include in your list of References material not cited in
your essay.
6.  Ensure your student number, ?tle of assessment, tutorial day/?me,
referencing system used and word count are included at the beginning
of your assignment before submi?ng it via the assignment dropbox
on Moodle.
Presenta?on 1,000 word report (+/- 10%), not including long quotes (>40 words as
defined in APA), list of References or assessment first page informa?on.
At least 3 references from the Unit’s reading list in addi?on to the news
media report and academic research ar?cle source.
Harvard or APA referencing system.
Marking
Criteria
Assignments will be marked using the following criteria, weighted equally:
1. Analyses news media text using news framing, narra?ve, ideology
and/or hegemony.
2. Assesses news media representa?on of academic research against the
values of accuracy, objec?vity and balance.
3. Demonstrates an understanding of whether qualita?ve and/or
quan?ta?ve research methods used by the academic research ar?cle, the
differences between them and whether the academic research ar?cle is
peer-reviewed or not.
4. Clear, concise and comprehensible wri?en expression appropriate for
university level and an academic audience.
5. Adherence to Harvard or APA referencing, at least 3 sources from the
Unit’s reading list and 2 other academically credible sources and word
count met.
Online or generic dic?onaries are not academically credible. Most online
sources will not be viewed as academically credible unless a peer-reviewed
academic journal site.
A marking rubric is available on the Unit’s Moodle site. This will be used as
the basis for marking and feedback on your assessment.
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Due Date:
Weighting Percentage:
Media/technology essay
5pm Sunday 5 November (end of Week 13) submission via Moodle dropbox
40
Addresses learning outcome(s):
On completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. demonstrate a firm understanding of multiple methods and approaches
by which to assess technology in various social and political terms;
2. demonstrate an understanding of the various ways by which to assess the mutual relationship between society and
technology;
3. demonstrate an awareness of ethics and citizenship via current issues in media and politics;
4. apply analytical tools to identify a societal or ethical problem resulting from the use of technologies.
Related graduate attribute(s):
1. UC graduates are professional – communicate effectively
1. UC graduates are professional – display initiative and drive, and use their organisation skills to plan and manage their
workload
1. UC graduates are professional – use creativity, critical thinking, analysis and research skills to solve theoretical and real-
world problems
2. UC graduates are global citizens – think globally about issues in their profession
2. UC graduates are global citizens – understand issues in their profession from the perspective of other cultures
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – evaluate and adopt new technology
3. UC graduates are lifelong learners – reflect on their own practice, updating and adapting their knowledge and skills for
continual professional and academic development
Purpose
Essay Question: How has a specific medium or technology (of your
choice), produced an impact upon society?
The purpose of the essay is to critically examine a medium or technology using
themes and concepts from the unit’s lectures and readings and additional
research. This will involve assessing and evaluating the relationship with and
the impact of, the medium/technology on society
Process Students choose either a medium or technology (examples are listed below
and are explained in the lectures) and cri?cally examine it using themes
and concepts from the unit’s lectures, readings and addi?onal research.
The objec?ve is to assess and evaluate the impact of the
medium/technology on, and its rela?onship with, society.
Some key ques?ons to be used as star?ng points are suggested in the next
sec?on. Examples of medium or technology include;
Media content: audio, audiovisual, visual, news, text, film, games
Online services: online news, eBooks, user-generated content sites such as
YouTube, social networking sites (SNS), music streaming sites (e.g Pandora,
Spo?fy) and audiovisual content (e.g. Hulu, NetFlix, Stan)
Pla?orms/devices: smartphones, tablets, gaming consoles, radio, TV,
newspapers, books, cinema, cameras
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For example, you might choose to examine the introduc?on & use of
smartphones. Or you could examine the move away from purchasing music
on CDs to purchasing online. You could examine the introduc?on &
development of gaming consoles and compare/contrast that with online
gaming. You could examine the advent of eBooks and the impact on
printed books. Or you could examine the produc?on and distribu?on of
online news and the rela?onships with printed and mobile news pla?orms.
You could look at a social networking site and, depending on your focus,
you could examine its actual use compared with its ‘ideal’ use &/or you
could examine the economics of user-generated content and how this
does/does not influence the ongoing development of the site.
If you are unsure of your essay focus, check with your Tutor.
Key
ques?ons
For your chosen medium/technology, cri?cally examine (assess and
evaluate the impact of the medium/technology on, and its rela?onship
with, society) it using themes and concepts from the unit’s lectures and
readings and addi?onal research.
The following ques?ons* are provided as star?ng points for your analysis.
YOU DO NOT HAVE TO ANSWER ALL OF THEM. You should choose which
are the most appropriate for your chosen medium/technology as well as
developing your own in the context of themes and concepts from this
course:
Histories
When and how did the medium/technology appear? Who and what was
involved in its inven?on and development? What did people imagine
would its main use and significance? How was it actually adopted, resisted
or ignored? Was the medium/technology used differently by different
groups or people or in different parts of the world? Who were the
early/late adopters of the medium/technology and what impacts did this
have?
Discourses and ideologies
What are the ideas or discourses associated with the medium/technology?
What do people think they do with the medium/technology? What are the
affects and emo?ons associated with the medium/technology? How is the
medium/technology represented/portrayed and wri?en and spoken about
in the media? How are ideas about what media is and what it does
changed by this medium/technology?
Exis?ng media
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How did/does the medium/technology fit into or disrupt exis?ng media?
Are there new companies and organisa?ons responsible for delivering new
kinds of media associated with the medium/technology? What are the
features and characteris?cs of these new companies/organisa?ons? What
are the economics of produc?on, distribu?on, exhibi?on, consump?on and
business models of these companies/organisa?ons? Who are the
audiences and publics that come into being or realign with the
medium/technology?
Cultural and social
How do/did people use the medium/technology? What is their actual
experience of it, independent of the marke?ng/promo?on of the intended
experience of the medium/technology? What do they do with it and with
whom? What are the par?cular cultures associated with the
medium/technology? How does the medium/technology affect the larger
culture and society? How are rela?ons among different groups of people,
and groups of things, altered, or believed to be altered, through the
introduc?on of the medium/technology? Have there been ‘moral panics’
associated with the medium/technology? What are the ethical
issues/implica?ons of the medium/technology?
*Ques?ons adapted from Goggin, G. (2012). New technologies and the
media (pp.123-124). Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave
Macmillan.
Presenta?on 2,000 word essay (+/- 10%), not including long quotes (>40 words in APA),
list of References or assessment coversheet.
At least 10 academically credible sources cited, including 6 sources from
the Unit’s reading list.
Harvard or APA referencing system.
Ensure your student ID, ?tle of assessment, word count and reference
system used are included at the beginning of your assignment before
submi?ng it via the assignment dropbox on Moodle.
Marking
criteria
Essays will be marked on the following criteria which are weighted equally:
1. Analysis of medium/technology using key ideas/concepts from the unit.
2. Research on medium/technology and presenta?on of appropriate
academically credible evidence.
3. Analysis of the academically credible evidence and the wider
implica?ons of it for the medium/technology and the wider society.
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4. Clear, concise and comprehensible wri?en expression appropriate for
university level and an academic audience.
5. Adherence to Harvard or APA referencing, at least 6 references from the
Unit’s reading list along with other academically credible sources and word
count met.
Online or generic dic?onaries are not academically credible. Most online
sources will not be viewed as academically credible unless a peer-reviewed
academic journal site.
A marking template is available on the Unit’s Moodle site. This will be used
as the basis for marking and feedback on your assessment.
5B. ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS
Submission of assessment items:
Where possible, all assessment items will be submitted online via the LearnOnline (Moodle) unit site. The first page of each assessment
item should include the following information:
Student ID:
Assessment Name:
Word Count (if applicable):
Students should note that names are not to be included on any assessment tasks/submissions. Only Student ID numbers should be
included (as per the Assessment Policy and Procedures).
Extensions
Students can apply for an extension to the submission due date for an assessment item through extenuating, evidenced circumstances
(specific details are found through the Assessment Policy and Procedures. Section 9.12). Extensions must be applied for before the due
date. Documentary evidence (e.g. medical certificate) will be expected for an extension to be granted, however this will not guarantee that
the application will be successful. The Unit Convener or relevant Discipline Convener will decide whether to grant an extension and the
length of the extension.
An Assignment Extension form is available from the Student Forms page.
Late submission of assignments without an approved extension will result in a penalty of 5% reduced marks from the total available, per
calendar day late. An assignment submitted over 7 days late will not be accepted.
All assessment items except the Tutorial Reading Presenta?on & Par?cipa?on will be submi?ed
online via the unit Moodle site. The first page should include the following informa?on:
Student ID:
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Assessment Name:
Word Count:
Reference System Used:
Tutorial day/?me:
Special Assessment Requirements:
Information on extensions and special consideration for assessments can be found in the Student Guide to Policies.
Year-Long Units: Students enrolled in year-long units (consisting of a part A and part B unit code) will be allocated a continuing grade
(CNTYL) on completion of part A. Once the student has completed part B, the grade for part A will be updated so that the grades for the
two unit codes are the same.
NO resubmits are permitted on any assessment item.
A reasonable a?empt must be made on ALL assessment items.
There are NO pass requirements on any individual assessment item in order to pass the unit.
There are penal?es for assessments submi?ed a?er the due ?me and date. See clause on Late
Submissions below.
Requests for extensions
Requests for extensions are to be made on the Extension Request Form available on Moodle with
accompanying appropriate documenta?on BEFORE THE DUE DATE to the Unit Convenor. Requests
for extensions will not be considered a?er the assessment due date/?me has passed and late
penal?es will apply as outlined in below.
An approved extension only grants addi?onal ?me: a student’s work will s?ll be assessed against
the marking criteria to ensure achievement of the required academic standard.
The responsibility rests on students to comply with unit requirements for comple?ng and
submi?ng assessable items for the unit. This responsibility is an integral part of professional
prac?ce and performance skills this unit seeks to promote; skills that are especially important for
those seeking professional careers in the media, communica?on and crea?ve industries.
Teaching staff have a responsibility to ensure equity and fairness to the majority of students who
submit assessable work on ?me. For these reasons, it is your responsibility to establish genuine and
excep?onal circumstances for an extension to be granted so that you are not perceived as having
gained an unfair advantage over other students who submit their work on ?me. You will generally
need documentary evidence to establish the nature of your circumstances.
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Students registered with Inclusion and Welfare – which supports students with disabili?es and
health condi?ons – who have a Reasonable Adjustment Plan may have addi?onal ?me indicated for
assessments. If an extension is required they should follow the condi?ons for a request for an
extension in this sec?on.
Late submissions and penal?es
This unit requires assessment items 2 and 3 to be submi?ed on Moodle. Students should be aware
that the assessment upload menu will record the ?me your assessment has been submi?ed. No
paper or email submissions will be accepted.
If a student fails to do their Tutorial Presenta?on in the week scheduled and has not been granted
an extension as per the condi?ons of this sec?on, they will be marked on a “Pass/Fail” basis,
meaning that the maximum grade given will be 64%, when the Presenta?on is made.
Supplementary Assessment:
Refer to the Assessment Policy and Procedures.
Academic Integrity
Students have a responsibility to uphold University standards on ethical scholarship. Good scholarship involves building on the work of
others and use of others’ work must be acknowledged with proper attribution made. Cheating, plagiarism, and falsification of data are
dishonest practices that contravene academic values.
To enhance understanding of academic integrity, it is expected that all students will complete the LearnOnline Academic Integrity Module
(AIM) at least once during their course of study. The module is automatically available as a listed site when students log into LearnOnline
(Moodle).
Use of Text-Matching Software
The University of Canberra has available, through LearnOnline (Moodle), text-matching software that helps students and staff reduce
plagiarism and improve understanding of academic integrity. The software matches submitted text in student assignments against material
from various sources: the internet, published books and journals, and previously submitted student texts. Click here for more information.
6. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
6a Learner Engagement
In order to get the most out of your studies, it is strongly recommended that you plan your time commitments, actively engage in class
discussions (online or face-to-face) and work with your peers as part of your study. The amount of time you will need to spend on study in
this unit will depend on a number of factors including your prior knowledge, learning skill level and learning style. Nevertheless, in
planning your time commitments you should note that for a 3 credit point unit the total notional workload over the semester or term is
assumed to be 150 hours. The total workload for units of different credit point value should vary proportionally. For example, for a 6 credit
point unit the total notional workload over a semester or term is assumed to be 300 hours.
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
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6b Inclusion and Engagement
It is strongly recommended that students who need assistance in undertaking the unit because of disability or an ongoing health condition
register with the Inclusion and Engagement Office as soon as possible so that reasonable adjustment arrangements can be made.
6c Participation Requirements:
A tutorial participation mark worth 10% of the overall marks available for the unit is part of assessment item 1.
6d Withdrawal:
If you are planning to withdraw please discuss with your Unit Convener. UC College students must also seek advice from the College.
Please see Withdrawal of Units for information on deadlines.
6e Required IT Skills:
Word-processing skills, effec?ve research skills through the use of the Library’s journals &
databases, use of the Unit’s Moodle site and PowerPoint or Prezi presenta?on skills. An
introduc?on to database and journal searching will be given in the lectures.
6f In-unit costs:
Note: To calculate your unit fees see: How do I calculate my fees?. The online UC Co-op Textbook Search is available for purchasing text
books.
6g Work Placement, Internships or Practicums:
None
6h Additional Information:
Use of Harvard or APA referencing system required.
7. STUDENT FEEDBACK

MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment 代写

All students enrolled in this unit will have opportunities to provide anonymous feedback on the unit at the beginning, middle and end of the
teaching period. This will be posted on your InterFace page at three stages of the teaching period. You can access InterFace through
7/31/2017 Unit Outline : Courses and Units : University of Canberra
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/uo-view/_nocache?uoo_id=164832&SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print 20/20
MyUC by logging in and opting for Moodle or InterFace. Your lecturer or tutor may also invite you to provide more detailed feedback on
their teaching through an additional anonymous questionnaire.
Changes to Unit Based on Student Feedback:
As an example of changes as a result of student feedback: students in 2013 indicated that they
thought tutorial par?cipa?on should be assessable so that students do not present to near empty
tutorial classes and this has been included in the 2016 Unit Outline. Con?nuing on previous year’s
success this has been included in 2017 Unit Outline.
8: AUTHORITY OF THIS UNIT OUTLINE
Any change to the information contained in Section 2 (Academic content), and Section 5 (Assessment) of this document, will only be
made by the Unit Convener if the written agreement of Head of Discipline and a majority of students has been obtained; and if written
advice of the change is then provided on the unit site in the learning management system. If this is not possible, written advice of the
change must be then forwarded to each student enrolled in the unit at their registered term address. Any individual student who believes
him/herself to be disadvantaged by a change is encouraged to discuss the matter with the Unit Convener.
© 2006 University of Canberra – Last updated April 13, 2017

MEDIA, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY assignment

MMCS261 Photo Media begin with photographs assignment

MMCS261 Photo Media begin with photographs assignment

MMCS261 Photo Media

Research Essay Topics

Research Essay (40%)Due date: Sunday 12th November 11:59pm

Submit to turnitin only (through link on ilearn). No hardcopy submission is required.

Your essay should demonstrated wide reading and in-depth critical analysis. You are expected to draw upon the weekly readings that relate to your chosen essay topic as well as at least academic sources from beyond the required and recommended readings. You must stay within 10% of the 2000 word count. Your reference list is not included in the word count. On the first page please include the following:
–          Your tutor’s name
–          Your name
–          Your chosen essay question

Write a 2000 word (plus references) research essay on one of the following topics:

1)    According to John Tagg, photography has no intrinsic identity but rather its “status as a technology varies with the power relations which invest it”(2003, 259). Discuss this claim with reference to one of the following photographic practices: photojournalism, crime or police photography or archiving.

2)    At the start of Sadness William Yang begins by saying “All my performances begin with photographs. First I take the slides, which I push around on my lightbox, then the words come.” Discuss the relationship between photography, spoken narrative and autobiography in Yang’s Sadness.

3)    Is it important to consider gender in relation to the history and practice of photography? Your answer should consider a specific historical moment or genre of photography.

4)    According to Melissa Miles, “street photography is circulating in ever more limited fields” (2015, 290). Discuss this claim with reference to both the history of street photography and to contemporary debates about privacy and photography in public spaces.

5)    According to Catherine Lumby we are living in “a time of profound moral panic about the boundaries between childhood and adulthood” (2010, n.p.) With reference to the work of Sally Mann or Bill Henson, critically discuss contemporary anxieties about the representation of children in photography.

6)    WJT Mitchell describes landscape as a ‘social hieroglyph that conceals the actual basis of its value . . . by naturalizing its conventions and conventionalizing its nature’ (Landscape and Power, 1994,5). Consider this claim in relation to two examples of Australian landscape photography.

7)    Amelia Jones argues that the photographic self-portrait “simultaneously, tantalizingly, both gives and takes the subject from us” (2002, 972). Discuss this claim in relation to two examples of photographic self-portraiture.

8)    Susie Lindfield insists that “photojournalists are responsible for the ethics of showing, but we are responsible for the ethics of seeing” (2011, 60).  Discuss this claim in relation to contemporary photojournalism. Your essay must refer to one or two specific examples of photojournalism.

MMCS261Photo Media

Assessment Criteria for Research Essay (40%)

There are three sets of criteria that are assessed in essays: reading and research; argument and analysis; and writing and structure. Within each of these sets, markers are looking for the following:

Reading and research:

–          evidence of critical engagement with set course materials
–          evidence of independent reading of appropriate academic material
–          evidence of thorough research (books, journals, media sources, archives – not random websites and wikipedia entries)

Argument and analysis:

–          well-articulated and well supported argument
–          evidence of critical thinking (through taking a position in relation to key ideas from the course, and supporting this position)
–          evidence of relational thinking (through making connections between key ideas from the course and wider literature, and supporting these connections)

Writing and structure:

–          clear, logical and coherent structure
–          clarity of expression
–          adequate referencing

It is in your interest to use the following as a checklist before submitting your essay:

Structure

·         Does the essay have a clear introduction, body and conclusion?           ☐
·         Does the introduction outline the points of the body of your essay?       ☐

Written Expression

·         Is the language clear, concise and appropriate to an academic essay? ☐
·         Is your punctuation correct?                                               ☐
·         Are your apostrophes where they should be and nowhere else?           ☐

MMCS261 Photo Media begin with photographs assignment 代写
Research

·         Do you refer to the set readings in your essay?                         ☐
·         Does the essay demonstrate thorough research and reference to appropriate academic material beyond the set readings?                              ☐

Argument

·         Does the essay present a coherent and well-supported argument?      ☐
·         Is there evidence of critical engagement with the set course material?       ☐

Presentation

·         Is the essay referenced correctly using the Harvard Style?                    ☐
·         Is the list of works cited presented adequately?                       ☐
·         Have you proof-read it?                                               ☐
·         Is the topic/question, along with the title and author of essay clearly stated at the top of the first page?                                      ☐
·         Is it double spaced?                                                      ☐
·         Have you used 12 point font size?                                       ☐

MMCS261 Photo Media begin with photographs assignment