Essay on the story of Joseph (Bible)

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Descriptionhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0hDkkfja2Y

The attached file contains a powerpoint on various literature definitions…Read genesis chapter 37-46 and write an analysis on the ways that the story of Joseph uses the literature elements from the link.

The attached file named Joseph contains an example of how the paper should look with instructions.

ALL THE INSTRUCTIONS ARE IN THE FILE PLEASE READ THROUGH.

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A Idea Collection Paper

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This assignment is designed to be a reflection and development of your research interests. It has two main sections: the idea-collection and a summary/reflection paper.   

You must collect 10 total items ( the rest can be other articles, websites, sources like podcasts, documentaries, etc.)  The selection of these items should be driven by intellectual curiosity and anchored by a viable research question. 

For each: 

Either provide a copy or brief summary and bibliographic information of the source. MLA Style is required. 

A short (a sentence or two) statement about what brought you to it/what caught your attention about it.

A possible research question inspired by it.

2.  A 1-2 page formal summary/reflection paper 

This short paper should serve as a summary and reflection piece to tie your collection together. It’s a formal document so title it, type and format it, etc. 

Length: 1-2 pages (250-500 words). 

Your paper should have two main sections. Divide your time equally between the two, as best as you can. I’ll be looking for insight, support, and development of ideas. 

1. The first should discuss the materials you’ve collected over time. Think of this as a guide, of sorts.

  • What is inside? If there are patterns, identify them. If there are clustered areas of interest, identify them. If there are any apparent “outliers” address them. If there doesn’t seem to be a specific type of inquiry or any themes, consider why. (HINT: Maybe you have eclectic interests or took the opportunity to explore widely, to find new things, etc.).
  • Identify one or more pieces you found particularly interesting, inspiring, useful, or whatever. 
  • Also, please address the kinds of sources you drew from. Where do you go for your ideas? What captures your attention? Why? 

2. The second section is a sort of self-reflection. 

  • I’d like you to discuss your interests. What captures your attention? What are you curious about? What do you care about? How is this reflected in your collection? 
    • A potentially useful thing here is to consider focus. Don’t repeat your summary. Make it new. Make it relevant for yourself.
      • For example, do you find yourself drawn to subjects about people? communication? art? science? Why? Do you tend to engage with topics with personal significance? Are you exploring interests directly related to career ambitions? Do you like to dig in deep on a single topic or follow interesting rabbit trails of information? Do you know why you’re interested in something? 
  • What, if anything, did you learn about your interests and/or about exploratory research? 
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Lesson 11 Death and Dying

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Lesson 11

Death and Dying

Lecture Notes

INTRODUCTION

The study of death, thanatology, can be approached as an external study of society, but must necessarily include an internal study of our own views on mortality.  We recognize that such a study is often uncomfortable because we don’t like to confront our own mortality.  It may be uncomfortable for those who have recently suffered the loss of someone they love dearly.  Death is a profoundly emotional subject. 

Care of the Dying

How do we care for those who are dying?  Often, we deny the certainty of death, grasping for every shred of hope for a cure.  While it may be easier to be objective when looking at death in our society at large, it becomes intensely personal when it’s a member of my family.  Members of the family may not all arrive at acceptance of a terminal prognosis at the same time, which can set the stage for conflict.  “I love my mother too much to just give up on her.”   The assigned documentary, “Being Mortal,” confronts this issue very well.

Often the dying person has other concerns on his/her mind.  Frequently there is life review or reflection.  Essentially, the question becomes “has my life mattered?”  Did I accomplish everything I wanted to do?  Will my family carry on the legacy of those things that are important to me?  Did I make a difference?  How will people remember me?  Do I have regrets?  Is it too late to make amends or restore relationships?  Is death the end, or is there more? 

How can I afford the medical bills?  Do I have enough money for a funeral?  How will others in my family make ends meet without my income?  What should I leave to whom?  What will happen to my home or my pets? 

Meanwhile, caregivers (usually family members) will be consumed with caring for the dying person, even to the extent of neglecting personal or family needs.  How can the caregiver get rest and relieve stress without feeling guilty? 

Tasks and Decisions

There are numerous decisions surrounding a death.  Often, the family is either numbed and paralyzed by grief, or so focused on details that they ignore or delay their grief.  Advance Directives and wills can alleviate much of the decision-making.  Pre-planned funerals, discussed openly with a funeral director, can take away much of that stress. 

Some decisions to discuss include (Dennis, pp. 133-134):

  • Budget
  • Burial or cremation
  • Type of casket
  • Flowers
  • Visiting hours
  • Clothing for the deceased
  • Type of funeral (religious or non-religious)
  • Funeral service or graveside service
  • Who will speak at the service
  • Choosing music or readings for the service
  • Choosing pallbearers
  • Choosing a place for the service
  • Choosing a final resting place and monument
  • Should children attend
  • How to write the obituary

Grieving

“It is a naïve opinion that links death closely to sorrow.  The tears of the living, which respond to its coming, are themselves far from having a meaning opposite to joy.  Far from being sorrowful, the tears are the expression of a keen awareness of shared life grasped in its intimacy.” (Bataille, p. 48)

Grief is the normal human reaction to loss.  It is also a very individual, personal expression.  It includes thoughts, feelings, physical, behavioral, and spiritual responses.  A grieving person may exhibit disbelief, confusion, anxiety, tension, pain, disorganization, and depression.  His or her emotions may include sadness, longing, loneliness, sorrow, self-pity, anguish, guilt, and anger. 

In some cases, grief may include a sense of relief, since a long-anticipated event has finally occurred.  Once I was talking with a woman whose father-in-law, for whom she was a caregiver, had just died.  I expressed, “I’m so sorry.”  She replied, “Well, I’m not!”  She wasn’t celebrating his death, but the long, agonizing process of his suffering was completed now. 

A former concept of grief stated that the surviving persons should sever ties with the deceased and move on with life.  This idea is being replaced today by the idea that the person may acknowledge the loss, but maintain an enduring connection with the deceased.  The typical marriage vow of “till death do us part” gives way to a longer, although modified, relationship.  This belief is called “continuing bonds.” 

Colin Murray Parkes (1998) has suggested that there are three main influences on a person’s course of grieving:

  1. The urge to look back, cry, and search for what is lost
  2. The urge to look forward, explore the world that emerges out of the loss, and discover what can be carried forward from the past into the future
  3. The social and cultural pressures that influence how the first two urges are inhibited or expressed.

Stephen Fleming and Paul Robinson (1991) offer, “You do not find meaning in death, you find meaning in the life that was lived.  Central to the struggle to find meaning in the life that was lived is the notion of the deceased’s legacy.  The legacy is the appreciation of how knowing and loving the deceased has irrevocably changed the survivor, thus realizing the transition from losing what one has to having what one has lost.” 

Even when a death has been anticipated, the associated grief may be profound. It’s important that others not chide someone for not grieving in a certain way.  While prolonged grief may require professional counseling, there is no prescribed time frame for grief.  In “The Tender Scar,” Richard Mabry recalls a pastor who asked his congregation to pray for a widow whose husband died a month ago, “and she isn’t over it yet.”  Coping with the death of his own wife, he took great offense at the comment.

Conclusion

In the work of aging, we often encounter both those who are dying and those who are grieving.  Despite our own discomfort, we need to be open and supportive to those in both situations.  As the text notes, hospice agencies can provide great support, even up to a year or more after someone’s death.  They often provide various types of support to survivors, even when the deceased was not covered under a hospice program.

Funeral directors can also be a great source of support.  They are often aware of numerous community resources to which they can provide referrals.

Clergy of various faiths can offer spiritual support as well.  As a nursing home administrator, I often brought in a clergy member to talk with staff after deaths.  Many staff appreciated this gesture. 

Aging services professionals need to demonstrate the qualities of being sensitive, willing to listen, and open, putting aside our own discomfort for the benefit of those we serve.

Works Cited

Bataille, G. (1992). Sacrifice, the festival, and the principles of the sacred world. In Hurley, R. Theory of religion. New York: Zone Books.

Dennis, D. (2009). Living, dying, grieving. Boston: Jones & Bartlett.

DeSpelder, L.A. & Strickland, A.L. (2015). The last dance: encountering death & dying. (10th ed.). New York: McGraw Hill Education.

Fleming, S.J. & Robinson, P.J. (1991). The application of cognitive therapy to the bereaved. In The challenge of cognitive therapy: applications to nontraditional populations, ed. Vallis, T.M., Howes, J.I., & Miller, P.C. New York: Plenum Press, pp. 135-158.

Mabry, R. (2006). The tender scar: life after the death of a spouse. (2nd ed.). Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications.

Parkes, C.M. (1998). Bereavement in adult life. British Medical Journal. 316, 856-859.

Stillion, J.M., & Attig, T. (2015). Death, dying, and bereavement. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

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Lesson 11 Death and Dying

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Lesson 11

Death and Dying

Lecture Notes

INTRODUCTION

The study of death, thanatology, can be approached as an external study of society, but must necessarily include an internal study of our own views on mortality.  We recognize that such a study is often uncomfortable because we don’t like to confront our own mortality.  It may be uncomfortable for those who have recently suffered the loss of someone they love dearly.  Death is a profoundly emotional subject. 

Care of the Dying

How do we care for those who are dying?  Often, we deny the certainty of death, grasping for every shred of hope for a cure.  While it may be easier to be objective when looking at death in our society at large, it becomes intensely personal when it’s a member of my family.  Members of the family may not all arrive at acceptance of a terminal prognosis at the same time, which can set the stage for conflict.  “I love my mother too much to just give up on her.”   The assigned documentary, “Being Mortal,” confronts this issue very well.

Often the dying person has other concerns on his/her mind.  Frequently there is life review or reflection.  Essentially, the question becomes “has my life mattered?”  Did I accomplish everything I wanted to do?  Will my family carry on the legacy of those things that are important to me?  Did I make a difference?  How will people remember me?  Do I have regrets?  Is it too late to make amends or restore relationships?  Is death the end, or is there more? 

How can I afford the medical bills?  Do I have enough money for a funeral?  How will others in my family make ends meet without my income?  What should I leave to whom?  What will happen to my home or my pets? 

Meanwhile, caregivers (usually family members) will be consumed with caring for the dying person, even to the extent of neglecting personal or family needs.  How can the caregiver get rest and relieve stress without feeling guilty? 

Tasks and Decisions

There are numerous decisions surrounding a death.  Often, the family is either numbed and paralyzed by grief, or so focused on details that they ignore or delay their grief.  Advance Directives and wills can alleviate much of the decision-making.  Pre-planned funerals, discussed openly with a funeral director, can take away much of that stress. 

Some decisions to discuss include (Dennis, pp. 133-134):

  • Budget
  • Burial or cremation
  • Type of casket
  • Flowers
  • Visiting hours
  • Clothing for the deceased
  • Type of funeral (religious or non-religious)
  • Funeral service or graveside service
  • Who will speak at the service
  • Choosing music or readings for the service
  • Choosing pallbearers
  • Choosing a place for the service
  • Choosing a final resting place and monument
  • Should children attend
  • How to write the obituary

Grieving

“It is a naïve opinion that links death closely to sorrow.  The tears of the living, which respond to its coming, are themselves far from having a meaning opposite to joy.  Far from being sorrowful, the tears are the expression of a keen awareness of shared life grasped in its intimacy.” (Bataille, p. 48)

Grief is the normal human reaction to loss.  It is also a very individual, personal expression.  It includes thoughts, feelings, physical, behavioral, and spiritual responses.  A grieving person may exhibit disbelief, confusion, anxiety, tension, pain, disorganization, and depression.  His or her emotions may include sadness, longing, loneliness, sorrow, self-pity, anguish, guilt, and anger. 

In some cases, grief may include a sense of relief, since a long-anticipated event has finally occurred.  Once I was talking with a woman whose father-in-law, for whom she was a caregiver, had just died.  I expressed, “I’m so sorry.”  She replied, “Well, I’m not!”  She wasn’t celebrating his death, but the long, agonizing process of his suffering was completed now. 

A former concept of grief stated that the surviving persons should sever ties with the deceased and move on with life.  This idea is being replaced today by the idea that the person may acknowledge the loss, but maintain an enduring connection with the deceased.  The typical marriage vow of “till death do us part” gives way to a longer, although modified, relationship.  This belief is called “continuing bonds.” 

Colin Murray Parkes (1998) has suggested that there are three main influences on a person’s course of grieving:

  1. The urge to look back, cry, and search for what is lost
  2. The urge to look forward, explore the world that emerges out of the loss, and discover what can be carried forward from the past into the future
  3. The social and cultural pressures that influence how the first two urges are inhibited or expressed.

Stephen Fleming and Paul Robinson (1991) offer, “You do not find meaning in death, you find meaning in the life that was lived.  Central to the struggle to find meaning in the life that was lived is the notion of the deceased’s legacy.  The legacy is the appreciation of how knowing and loving the deceased has irrevocably changed the survivor, thus realizing the transition from losing what one has to having what one has lost.” 

Even when a death has been anticipated, the associated grief may be profound. It’s important that others not chide someone for not grieving in a certain way.  While prolonged grief may require professional counseling, there is no prescribed time frame for grief.  In “The Tender Scar,” Richard Mabry recalls a pastor who asked his congregation to pray for a widow whose husband died a month ago, “and she isn’t over it yet.”  Coping with the death of his own wife, he took great offense at the comment.

Conclusion

In the work of aging, we often encounter both those who are dying and those who are grieving.  Despite our own discomfort, we need to be open and supportive to those in both situations.  As the text notes, hospice agencies can provide great support, even up to a year or more after someone’s death.  They often provide various types of support to survivors, even when the deceased was not covered under a hospice program.

Funeral directors can also be a great source of support.  They are often aware of numerous community resources to which they can provide referrals.

Clergy of various faiths can offer spiritual support as well.  As a nursing home administrator, I often brought in a clergy member to talk with staff after deaths.  Many staff appreciated this gesture. 

Aging services professionals need to demonstrate the qualities of being sensitive, willing to listen, and open, putting aside our own discomfort for the benefit of those we serve.

Works Cited

Bataille, G. (1992). Sacrifice, the festival, and the principles of the sacred world. In Hurley, R. Theory of religion. New York: Zone Books.

Dennis, D. (2009). Living, dying, grieving. Boston: Jones & Bartlett.

DeSpelder, L.A. & Strickland, A.L. (2015). The last dance: encountering death & dying. (10th ed.). New York: McGraw Hill Education.

Fleming, S.J. & Robinson, P.J. (1991). The application of cognitive therapy to the bereaved. In The challenge of cognitive therapy: applications to nontraditional populations, ed. Vallis, T.M., Howes, J.I., & Miller, P.C. New York: Plenum Press, pp. 135-158.

Mabry, R. (2006). The tender scar: life after the death of a spouse. (2nd ed.). Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications.

Parkes, C.M. (1998). Bereavement in adult life. British Medical Journal. 316, 856-859.

Stillion, J.M., & Attig, T. (2015). Death, dying, and bereavement. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

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DA assessment

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Diagnostic Assessment of In-Class Interview

Students are required to observe the role-play in class. Using the format provided, students will record or take notes of the diagnostic assessment of the client interviewed. The due date is November 4, 2019, to be submitted by 3:00 pm.

write a full diagnostic assessment based on the format provided.

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated on the demonstrated ability to incorporate all required components, including a Mental Status Exam, and offer a logical and well-supported diagnosis, and treatment plan recommendations.

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Spiegelman Maus 1&2

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DescriptionThe Maus I&II
5 page research paper, MLA format that includes a clearly defined position, argument, and evidence (from The Maus I&II by Spiegelman, primary and the secondary sources). Topic: The Maus I&II by Spiegelman begins with Hitler’s quote: “The Jews are undoubtedly a race, but they are not human.” In light of author’s choice to represent book characters through the animal imagery examine Nazi Germany’s biological racialism, racism, and ideology by reviewing the peer-reviewed research of primary and secondary sources. Why were certain populations depicted as mice, pigs, cats, dogs, … etc.? How accurate is the Nazi racial logic depicted in Spiegelman work? Do you see the connection to the greater transnational ideas, ideologies, and trends (e.g. social- Darwinism, fascism, degeneration, and eugenics). This is not an opinion paper but a well-researched attempt using a multitude of peer-reviewed sources to answer these questions or position your valid argument within this framework. Must have works cited and include a minimum of 5 peer reviewed sources.

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What is the story of the ring of Gyges supposed to show about most peoples attitude towards morality? Is this claim correct? Explain why or why not.

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he Republic, Plato
Your paper should be about three pages long. This is only a guideline intended to indicate how long I imagine a good answer would have to be. I will not penalize you for going over or under this length. However if you are under this length I suggest carefully considering what more may need to be said.
Clearly list which question you are answering.

Please provide page references when appropriate. I.e. when mentioning a specific idea. Keep quotes to a minimum. In a paper this short you should use your own words.

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